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April 24, 2018

Two Days with Hans-Thies Lehmann Day #2

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April 23 & April 24
Segal Theatre
Discussions + All Day Screenings

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Join us for two evenings with German theatre researcher and author Hans-Thies Lehmann. His highly influential publication, Postdramatic Theatre (Routledge, 2006), established the modern visage of avant-garde theatre by cataloguing and defining the tendencies and stylistic traits of experimental works since the end of the 1960s. Scholars and colleagues Marvin Carlson, Elinor Fuchs, Brandon Woolf, John Jesurun, Uwe Mengel, Molly Davies, Peter Eckersall, Jonathan Kalb, Carol Martin, Melissa Wansin Wong, and Frank Hentschker will join Lehmann in discussion throughout the sessions.

Monday, April 23

Daytime screenings of excerpts from works by:

Robert Wilson
The Wooster Group
John Jesurun
Jan Lauwers
Romeo Castellucci
She She Pop
René Pollesch

10:00am Robert Wilson – The Civil Wars (1984)
11:00am The Wooster Group – Brace Up! (1991/2003)
                  To You, The Birdie! ( Phèdre) (2002)
12:00pm John Jesurun – Shatterhand Massacree – Riderless Horse (1985)
Black Maria (1987)
1:00pm Jan Lauwers & Needcompany: The Deer House (2008)
2:00pm Romeo Castellucci – Orestea (2015)
 Giulio Cesare Spared Parts (1997)
3:00pm She She Pop (with ihre Väter) – TESTAMENT (2010)
4:00pm René Pollesch – Stadt als Beute (City as Prey) (2005)
5:00pm Tadeusz Kantor – Dead Class (1975)

Evening Discussion:
6:30pm Postdramatic Theatre and the 21 Century
Hans-Thies Lehmann

7:00pm New Forms of Theatre – Conversation I
Uwe Mengel, John Jesurun, Molly Davies & Hans-Thies Lehmann

7:20pm Performance in the Age of Performance – Conversation II
Bertie Ferdman, André Lepecki & Hans-Thies Lehmann

7:40pm Dramaturgy and Asian Theatres – Conversation III
Peter Eckersall, Melissa Wansin Wong & Hans-Thies Lehmann

 

Tuesday, April 24

Daytime screenings of excerpts from works by:

Tadeusz Kantor
Théatre du Soleil/Ariane Mnouchkine
Klaus Michael Grüber
Einar Schleef
Angelus Novus
Jan Fabre
andcompany&Co

11:00am Ariane Mnouchkine/Théatre du Soleil – 1789 (1970)
Henri IV (1982)
12:00pm Klaus Michael Grüber – Die Bakchen (The Bacchae) (1974)
1:00pm Einar Schleef – Faust (1990)
Ein Sportstuck (by Elfriede Jelinek, 1998)
2:00pm Jan Fabre/Troubleyn – The Power of Theatrical Madness (1986, revived 2012)
Mount Olympus (2016)
3:00pm andcompany & Co. – Colonial Digital: The Empire Feeds Back! (2018)
4:00pm Rimini Protokoll – Wallenstein (2005)
Prometheus in Athens (2010)
5:00pm Gob Squad – Western Society (2013)

Evening Discussion:
6:30pm On Tragedy
Hans-Thies Lehmann

7:00pm On Writing – Conversation I
Elinor Fuchs, Jonathan Kalb & Hans-Thies Lehmann

7:20pm Theater of the Real – Conversation II
Marvin Carlson, Carol Martin & Hans-Thies Lehmann

7:40pm German Theatre and the Giessen Institut – Conversation III
Brandon Woolf, Frank Hentschker & Hans-Thies Lehmann

Special thanks to Richard Schechner and Yale University’s Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures (Katrin Trüstedt and Christian Kirchmeier).

 

Hans-Thies Lehmann is a professor emeritus for Theatre, Film, and Media Studies at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main from 1988 until he was given emeritus status. His publications include Bertolt Brecht’s Hauspostille–Text und kollektives Lesen (1978, with Helmut Lethen); Theater und Mythos. Die Konstitution des Subjekts im Diskurs der antiken Tragödie (1991); Postdramatisches Theater (1999, now a standard work and translated into 26 languages); Heiner Müller Handbuch (ed. with Patrick Primavesi, 2003); and Tragödie und dramatisches Theater (Routledge, 2013). Hans-Thies Lehmann first studied general and comparative literary studies in Berlin and studied for his doctorate with Peter Szondi until his death. After gaining his doctorate, he was a visiting professor at the Universiteit van Amsterdam from 1979 to 1982. From 1983 to 1988, he was a university assistant at the Institute for Applied Theatre Studies in Gießen, where he substantially contributed to establishing and shaping the course of study with colleague Andzej Wirth. As a university professor for theatre studies at the J. W. Goethe-Universität Frankfurt/Main he made a remarkable contribution in devising theatre, film, and music studies courses, as well as establishing a course on dramaturgy in the framework of the Hessische Theaterakademie. In addition to guest professorships in Paris (France), Kaunas (Lithuania), Kraków (Poland), and Virginia (USA), Lehmann also works as a dramaturg for Jossi Wieler, Peter Palitzsch, Christof Nel, Theodoros Terzopoulos, Jan Fabre, and produces his own stage projects. He is on the board of the Gesellschaft für Theaterwissenschaft and a member of the Deutsche Akademie der Künste in Berlin. Hans-Thies Lehmann lives in Berlin with theatre critic Helen Varopoulou.

Start: Apr 24, 2018
End: Apr 24, 2018
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April 30, 2018

Re-Reading Oppression: One-act plays by Amiri Baraka, Harold Pinter, and Salah Abdul-Saboor

Photo by Salma S. Zohdi

 

Monday, April 30
Segal Theatre

5:30pm, 6:30pm, 7:30pm Readings + Discussion

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

With oppressive regimes regenerating themselves by applying practices commonly undertaken by dictatorships, the power of art remains an essential force that motivates the masses to resist and fight against the normalization of such abusive practices. Join us for a mini-festival that aims to analyze and track the dynamics of oppression, discrimination, and abuse when portrayed by three significant playwrights from the U.S., England, and Egypt. All readings will be followed by a brief conversation, and the event will conclude with a panel discussion and a Q&A with the directors, Marvin Carlson, and others. Discussion moderated by Frank Hentschker. Concept and dramaturgy by Salma S. Zohdi.

5:30pm LeRoi Jones/Amiri Baraka’s Dutchman (1964)
Directed by Kareem Fahmy

A powerful one-act drama, Dutchman is set on a New York subway train, the play is a searing two-character confrontation that begins playfully, but builds rapidly in suspense and symbolic resonance.

“Dutchman” is presented by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, INC.

6:30pm Harold Pinter’s One for the Road (1984)
Directed by NJ Agwuna

Considered by Frank Rich as Pinter’s “statement about the human rights abuses of totalitarian governments”. The play is set in a room, during the course of one day, where family of three–a father, mother, and a child–are interrogated and tortured.

“One for the Road” is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

7:30pm Salah Abdul-Saboor’s Night Traveller (1969)
Directed by Robin A. Eriksen & translated by M.M. Enani.

A black comedy set in a train heading to an unknown destination with three main characters: Narrator, Passenger, and Conductor. Throughout this absurdist narrative, the Conductor manipulates the Passenger’s identity by playing mind games and exerting oppressive practices.

Roles in all three plays are performed by Jordan Bellow, Ali Nasser, and Vanessa Vaché.

Stage directions read by Mohamed El Batran.

This event is curated by dramaturg and Segal Center’s 2017/18 Next Generation Fellow Salma S. Zohdi, in collaboration with director Robin A. Eriksen.

Special thanks to Ira Dworkin, Walid El Hamamsy, M.M. Enani, and Moataza Salah Abdel Sabour.

 

About the playwrights: 

Salah Abdul-Saboor is a pioneer of modern Arabic poetry, he and other Arab poets laid the foundation of a new school of Arabic poetry. They formulated their own experience in new authentic, creative patterns. In his early youth, he tried to find a new significance beyond rhetoric eloquent expression, attending to approach other realms of arts such as music and painting. In 1957, his first collection of poems People in my Country was published, shooting the poet into fame. Abdul-Saboor’s literature was not confined to poetry, but rather extended to poetic drama. Within a period of ten years, he had five poetic plays published. The first was The Tragedy of Al-Hallaj (1965), for which he was granted the State Incentive Award for Theatre in 1966. In addition to poetry and poetic drama, the great poet also practiced critical writing. Abdel Sabour was a follower of the free art which viewed art as an expression of unbridled imaginativeness and true, vehement emotions, within a highly romantic context. He believed that genuine poetry could be written only through absolute self-communion; he remained faithful to his own principles all his life until his death on August 14, 1981.

 

Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones) is one of the most respected and widely published African-American writers. With the beginning of Black Civil Rights Movements during the sixties, Baraka explored the anger of African-Americans and used his writings as a weapon against racism. He is also the author of over 40 books of essays, poems, drama, and music history and criticism, a poet icon and revolutionary political activist who has recited poetry and lectured on cultural and political issues extensively in the USA, the Caribbean, Africa, and Europe. With influences on his work ranging from musical orishas such as Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane, Thelonius Monk, and Sun Ra to the Cuban Revolution, Malcolm X and world revolutionary movements, Baraka is renowned as the founder of the Black Arts Movement in Harlem in the 1960s that became, though short-lived, the virtual blueprint for a new American theater aesthetics. The movement and his published and performance work, such as the signature study on African-American music, Blues People (1963) and the play Dutchman (1963) practically seeded “the cultural corollary to black nationalism” of that revolutionary American milieu.

 

Harold Pinter was a Nobel Prize-winning British playwright, screenwriter, director and actor. Harold Pinter is generally seen as the foremost representative of British drama in the second half of the 20th century. That he occupies a position as a modern classic is illustrated by his name entering the language as an adjective used to describe a particular atmosphere and environment in drama: “Pinteresque”. Pinter made his playwriting debut in 1957 with The Room, presented in Bristol. Other early plays were The Birthday Party (1957), at first a fiasco of legendary dimensions but later one of his most performed plays, and The Dumb Waiter (1957). His conclusive breakthrough came with The Caretaker (1959), followed by The Homecoming (1964) and other plays. It is said of Harold Pinter that following an initial period of psychological realism he proceeded to a second, more lyrical phase with plays such as Landscape (1967) and Silence (1968) and finally to a third, political phase with One for the Road (1984), Mountain Language (1988), The New World Order(1991) and other plays. Since 1973, Pinter has won recognition as a fighter for human rights, alongside his writing. He has often taken stands seen as controversial.

 

About the creative team: 

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NJ Agwuna (Director) is a freelance theater/ film director and actor from central Maryland, currently working on her MFA at Columbia University. She has worked on a national and international scale exploring classic text, developing new plays, devising, and investigating new ways to reach audiences. Some of NJ’s credits include The River Rouge (Director),  Freedom Train (Director), The Tempest (Director), Endangered: the Eco Musical (Associate Director), Love and Information (Director), Good Man(Director), Town Hall (Director), Truth or Lie (Director), What She Found (Director), Then She Fell (ASM), Amazing Spider-Man 2, Daredevil, and Jessica Jones. More at: www.njagwuna.com

 

Photo by Matthew Dunivan

Robin A. Eriksen is a Norwegian director working both in the US and Norway. He’s a trained actor from the American Academy of Dramatic arts, has a bachelors degree in Theatre Studies from the University of Oslo, as well as an MFA in Directing from Columbia University. After years working in theatre he’s found his passion in directing for the stage; deep diving into different dramatic texts, composing living images, and communicating with actors and designers. This spring he will be working on four new plays, as well as directing and leading the design process for a new show at Dyreparken i Kristiansand, Norways largest tourist attraction.

 

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Kareem Fahmy is a Canadian-born director and playwright of Egyptian descent. He is a 2017-2018 National Directors Fellow (The O’Neill/NNPN). He has directed and co-conceived a number of world premiere productions including Sevan K. Greene’s This Time (Rising Circle, New York Times Critics’ Pick), James Scruggs’s 3/Fifths (3LD, New York Times 5 Must-See Shows), and Nikkole Salter’s Indian Head (Luna Stage). Other work: Rohina Malik’s The Mecca Tales (NY & NJ premieres), Adam Kraar’s Alternating Currents (world premiere). Kareem has developed plays with New York Theatre Workshop (where he is a Usual Suspect), MCC, Second Stage, Soho Rep, New Dramatists, The Lark, Ensemble Studio Theatre, Sundance, The Civilians, Noor Theatre, Silk Road Rising, and Berkeley Rep. He is a founder of Maia Directors, a consulting group for organizations and artists engaging with Middle Eastern stories. He is currently adapting the beloved Egyptian novel The Yacoubian Building for the stage. MFA: Columbia University. www.KareemFahmy.com

 

Photo by Annabel Guevara

Salma S. Zohdi is an Egyptian Dramaturg based in New York City. She is the 2017/2018 Next Generation Fellow at The Martin E. Segal Theatre Center. Salma is a recipient of two international fellowship awards from the American Association for University Women. When she lived in Egypt she worked as a producer, teaching artist, stage manager, playwright, dramaturg, translator, and assistant director. Credits at Columbia University include: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?The Love Song of J. Robert Oppenheimer, and Disposable Promises. New York City credits: Nathan the Wise at CSC, The Mecca Tales, an evening of “Arab Classic Plays”, and American Dreams & Arabian Nights at the BRICLab. Salma is also a collaborator on a work-in-development of a theatre adaptation of Alaa El Aswany’s acclaimed Egyptian novel The Yacoubian Building. At the Segal’s spring 2018 season, she is a co-curator and dramaturg of “Re-Reading Oppression,” an evening of a curated reading series of one-act plays that chronicle oppression, discrimination, and abuse. MA: The American University in Cairo – English & Comparative Literature. MFA: Columbia University – Theatre (Dramaturgy).

 

About the actors: 

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Jordan Bellow is a New York based actor originally hailing from California. He was most recently seen in a production of Jeremy O. Harris’ The Feels as part of the #americanAF Festival at the New Ohio Theatre. He played the title role of Macbeth and was also seen in Alkestis as part of Columbia Stages’ MFA thesis productions at the Connelly Theatre. Other Columbia credits include Balm In Gilead and Ward Six at the Schapiro Theatre. He has also performed in readings for MCC’s Youth Company at Rattlestick Playwrights Theatre and at Dixon Place. Regionally, he just closed a co-production of A Raisin In The Sun at Indiana Repertory Theatre and Syracuse Stage. Other regional credits include All The Way, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory and Fly at Florida Studio Theatre. Television credits include Gotham, Orange Is The New Black. He received a BFA in Theatre Performance at Chapman University.

 

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Ali Nasser began his acting career in Egypt, where he played a recurring role on ‘Lahazat Harega’, the Egyptian adaptation of the hit TV show ER, and served as a voice actor for the Disney Channel in the Middle East. After studying theatre and film at the American University in Cairo, Ali helped found ACT, a non-profit theater organization that staged multiple English-speaking productions in Cairo. His theater credits include: Angels Among Us, Gasping, Guys and Dolls, Celebration, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. Advertising copywriter by day, Upright Citizens Brigade student and kettlebell kickboxer by night. Learn more at www.thealinasser.com

 

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Vanessa Vaché
is a New York based actress originally from Prescott, Arizona. She is graduate and former company member of the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. Recent NY theatre credits include “The Way Back” (Theatre For One), “Summertime” (Columbia Stages), “Strange Country” (Access Theatre), “Utility”* (Rattlestick, *NYIT award winner Best Premier Production 2016) “Rantoul and Die” (Cherry Lane Theater), “The Bad and The Better” (Playwrights Horizons) and “HotelMotel” (Gershwin Hotel). Upcoming this summer 2018: “Solitary” produced by Dutch Kills Theatre Company.Thank you to Robin for the opportunity to be a part of such a special event!

 

 

 

 

Start: Apr 30, 2018
End: Apr 30, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
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June 26, 2018

Pride Voices: New Plays from Taiwan with Li-Ying Chien and Pao-Chang Tsai

Left: Li-Ying Chien’s The Possible Memoirs of a Traitor. Photo by Chin Jung Chun.
Right: Pao-Chang Tsai’s Solo Date. Photo courtesy of the artist

Tuesday, June 26
Segal Theatre

6:30pm Readings + Discussion

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Join us for an evening with two leading contemporary Taiwanese playwrights, Li-Ying Chien and Pao-Chang Tsai.

The evening will feature excerpted readings from The Possible Memoirs of a Traitor by Li-Ying Chien (directed by Knud Adams) and Solo Date by Pao-Chang Tsai (directed and performed by Tsai; dramaturgy by Soriya Chum). Followed by a panel discussion with the playwrights Li-Ying Chien and Pao-Chang Tsai, director Knud Adams, dramaturg Soriya Chum, James Wilson (Professor of Theatre, The Graduate Center), Yu-Yun Hsieh (Comparative Literature scholar, The Graduate Center), and Dennis Yueh-Yeh Li (Director). Moderated by Frank Hentschker.

The excerpt of The Possible Memoirs of a Traitor will be read by Alton Alburo, Jon Viktor Corpuz, Stephanie Ho, Abrielle Kuo, Kristine Haruna Lee, Jordan Rutter, and Nicholas Yenson.

Through their plays and stage works Chien and Tsai have reinvigorated the Taiwanese theatre-scape. Blending new media, real-life event, and various performative techniques, their highly political and engaged works give voice to an emerging cultural movement in Taiwan. As established queer artists, their creative processes and cultural productions also shed light on the struggles and achievements of the LGBTQ community in Taiwan and Asia today.

Based on a comprehensive field study of the LGBTQ movement, HIV/AIDS medical treatment, and family and religious issues in Taiwanese society, Li-Ying Chien’s The Possible Memoirs of a Traitor (2017) uncovers stories from a Taipei gay shelter in the 90’s. Pao-Chang Tsai’s Solo Date (2016) takes place in the 2030’s. Using traditional Taiwanese ritual and AI technology, a man reaches back in time in search of his deceased lover. But after decrypting the lover’s private data, new truths come to light.

Co-curated by Yu Chien Liu (Martin E. Segal Theatre Center) and Chi-Ping Yen (Taipei Cultural Center in New York), with support from Ministry of Culture, Taiwan and Taipei Cultural Center in New York.

 

 

Photo by Bien Dong

Li-Ying Chien is a Taiwanese playwright and director. Li-Ying received her BA degree in Theatre Arts from Chinese Culture University and majored in MFA Playwriting at Taipei National University of the Arts. Selected as one of the “Top 10 Promising Theatre Artists” by Performing Arts Review magazine in 2011, she was also named “Outstanding Theatre Artist” by the same magazine in 2012. Li-Ying was the Artist-in-Residence of The National Theater & Concert Hall in 2015.

 

 

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Pao-Chang Tsai graduated from the Department of Drama and Theatre at the National Taiwan University and received his master in music theatre from Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, University of London. He was the co-artistic director at Tainaner Ensemble from 2009 to 2018. The Common Wealth Magazine has selected Pao-Chang Tsai as the Future Young Leader in Performing arts. He also went to America Repertory Theater at Harvard University for further study in Voice and Speech sponsored by Asian Cultural Council, and visited Moscow Art Theatre for three months.

 

 

 

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Knud Adams is a director of new and experimental plays. His recent productions include Tin Cat Shoes (Trish Harnetiaux, Clubbed Thumb), Aloha, Aloha, or When I Was Queen (Eliza Bent, Abrons), The Workshop (Torrey Townsend, Soft Focus), Asshole (Justin Kuritzkes, JACK), On a Clear Day I Can See to Elba (Eliza Bent, The New Ohio), Every Angel is Brutal (Julia Jarcho, Clubbed Thumb), Tom & Eliza (Celine Song, JACK), That Poor Girl and How He Killed Her (Jen Silverman, U. of Rochester), Krazytown (Jenny Schwartz, NYU), and Snore (Max Posner, Juilliard). He is a Drama League Artist in Residence and a former Drama League Directing Fellow, Soho Rep Writer/Director Lab member, and Playwrights Horizons Directing Resident. www.knudadams.com

 

 

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Soriya K. Chum is a dramaturg and producer of talks, performances, and live events. He is currently the Manager of Humanities & Studio Programs at Theatre for a New Audience. Previously, Soriya has held roles at the Asian American Arts Alliance, the Martin E. Segal Center, Theatre Communications Group, and HERE Arts Center. MFA in Dramaturgy, Columbia University.

 

 

 

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James F. Wilson is Professor of English and Theatre at LaGuardia Community College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is a former executive director of CUNY’s Center for LGBT Studies (CLAGS), and his articles and reviews have appeared in numerous academic journals and chapter anthologies. He is co-editor of The Journal of American Drama and Theatre, published by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, and the author of Bulldaggers, Pansies, and Chocolate Babies: Performance, Race, and Sexuality in the Harlem Renaissance (University of Michigan Press, 2010; paperback 2011).

 

 

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Yu-Yun Hsieh is a Taiwanese writer and academic, currently a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and an adjunct lecturer in English at Hunter College. She is the recipient of the 2004 UNITAS Emerging Writers Award and the 2009 Taipei Literature Award. Her Chinese translation of Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49 was published in 2014.  She is also a former fiction fellow of the Writers’ Institute of CUNY. Her work has appeared in n+1Open Letters MonthlyWorld Literature TodayTimes Literary Supplement and The New York Times Book Review.

 

 

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Originally from Taiwan, Dennis Yueh-Yeh Li earned his MA in Performance Studies at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. He works as a director, playwright, and performer, having created productions addressed upon sexuality, philosophy, and politics, to give his unique perspectives on time, space, and power relations. Dennis is an Associate Artistic Director of the Living Theatre, is also a former fellowship recipient of the Institute of Target Margin Theater. His directing credits include L.ear (Dixon Place), Blind (Theater for the New City), The (New) Trial (Theater for the New City), and Civilization and Its Discontents (Judson Memorial Church). Currently, Dennis is the New York Directing Fellow of Drama League.

 

 

Start: Jun 26, 2018
End: Jun 26, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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September 27, 2018

Towards Arab Dramaturgies (Day 1)

Hunter Canning  World Premier of The Strangest. by Betty Shamieh, 2017, 4th Street Theater 

Thursday, September 27th   
2:00pm–9:00pm Conference Room #9206, 9th floor

Friday, September 28th   
9:00am–6:00pm Skylight Room #9100, 9th floor

Free + Open to the public
First come, first served
Please RSVP here: mestc@gc.cuny.edu

We would like to invite you to participate and attend the upcoming  Towards Arab Dramaturgies symposium in New York City at the Graduate Center, CUNY, New York.

The 2018 symposium Towards Arab Dramaturgies is part of the exchange partnership between the Martin E. Segal Theater Center, the Ph.D. Program in Theatre and Performance at The Graduate Center CUNY and the Theater Initiative at the American University of Beirut (AUB). The symposium is organized and curated by Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall, Frank Hentschker and Salma S. Zohdi, with additional support from Sahar Assaf and Robert Myers.

|About the Symposium|

With a focus in this symposium on Arabic dramaturgies, we hope to begin to answer these questions. As a term that bridges the ideas and practice of contemporary performance, dramaturgy draws our attention to the process of artistic production. It explores the notion that process is performance and invites us to look at the question of how artists connect ideas and forms in their work.

This symposium will feature research papers, artist talks and roundtable events. The sessions and papers will be compiled in a publication/book that will be generated from the discussions at the convening. The event will be live streamed and will be archived at the Segal Center’s Youtube page.

Contemporary theatre and performance in the Arabic world is a diverse and contested set of practices that are unfolding in a fast-changing political and culturally complex region. In this situation, the performing arts are under pressure to independently produce new work, uphold traditions— and simultaneously to speak about contemporary lives, nationalism, class, race, religion, gender and new forms of theatre. In this symposium, we ask how theatre can continue to grow, develop artistically and continue to be a voice in the future of the Arabic world. How can the theatre in the region thrive?

Scheduled speakers and panelists include: Khalid Amine, Eman Antar, Sahar Assaf, Dalia Basiouny, Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi,
Wafaa Bilal, Leila Buck, Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall,
Yussef El Guindi, Frank Hentschker, Rania Lee Khalil,
Amahl Khouri, Ashley Marinaccio, Robert Myers, Rashi Mishra, Rubén Polendo (Theatre Mitu), Heather Raffo, Betty Shamieh, and Sarah Youssef.

|Schedule|

Day 1, Thursday, Sept, 27
(Conference Room #9206, 9th floor)

 

2:00pm – 5:00pm      Paper Presentations / Q&A

  • Robert Myers: Using Theater History, Translation Studies and Performance Studies to Redefine Arab Dramaturgy
  • Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi: Resistance Creative Languages
  • Eman Antar: Dances of Resistance in the Middle East and North Africa
  • Rashi Mishra: Traversing through the Siege: Role of movement and memory in performing cultural resistance
  • Ashley Marinaccio: Youth Theatre in Palestine

5:00pm –  6:00pm            Break

6:00pm –  6:15pm            Welcome note by Chase Robinson
Welcome by Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall, Frank Hentschker, Sahar Assaf, and Robert Myers

6:30pm –  7:30pm            Keynote by Wafaa Bilal:
Participatory Art, Multiple Platforms / Q&A

 7:30pm –  7:40pm            A tribute to Hazem Azmi: Moment of Silence, Excerpt readings

7:40pm –  9:00pm            Drinks & Snacks in Green Room, Room 3111, 3rd Floor

For day 2 schedule, click here.

About the Participants:

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Khalid Amine is Senior Professor of Performance Studies at the Faculty of Letters and Humanities, Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Tetouan, Morocco. Among his published books: Beyond Brecht (1996), Moroccan Theatre Between East and West (2000), Fields of Silence in Moroccan Theatre (2004), Dramatic Art and the Myth of Origins: Fields of Silence (2007). Amine is Co-author with Distinguished Professor Marvin Carlson The Theatres of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia: Performance Traditions of the Maghreb (London & New York: Palgrave, 2012).

 

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Eman Mostafa Antar is a translator and master research scholar at the Department of English Language and Literature, Cairo University. Her main areas of research are visual, cultural and gender studies. In 2016, she participated in Dancing the Self, a contemporary dance workshop for women and in April 2017, she performed in a project entitled: (Un)Covered en Masse that was staged on Falaki theatre, Cairo, along with other 25 women. She is also a member of two creative writing &storytelling groups: Seshat and Ana Elhekaya. Now, she is a Fulbright foreign language teaching assistant (FLTA) of Arabic language in Northeastern University, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Boston, MA.

 

Photo by Rayan Ghannam

Sahar Assaf is an actress, stage director and Assistant Professor of Theatre at the American University of Beirut. She recently translated and directed Garcia-Lorca’s Blood Wedding as a site-specific performance and co-translated, co-directed and starred in Shakespeare’s King Lear. Sahar is a member of Lincoln Center Director’s Lab (2014), a member of Directors Lab North in Toronto (2017) and a Fulbright alumnus with an MA in Theatre Studies from Central Washington University (2011).

 

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Dalia Basiouny is an Egyptian writer, theatre maker, activist, academic and translator. Her theatre work includes directing 20 plays performed in Egypt, England, USA, Morocco, Iraq, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia and Germany. Basiouny’s theatre and academic work focuses on the role of women in theatre. Her Ph.D. from CUNY Graduate Center explores the political theatre of Arab American Women after 9/11. She established “Sabeel for the Arts” in Cairo,1997. This independent group promotes women’s work, explores non-traditional theatre settings, and new ways of telling women stories in theatre and on film. She is a recipient of many awards including the Fulbright Arts Grant, USA; the British Council Chevening Scholarship, UK; and the theatre award from the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture (AFAC) for her play “Solitaire”.

 

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Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi born in Algiers and operating from Brussels, is a curator, dramaturge and documentary filmmaker. She was involved as guest curator in ‘Casablanca-Energienoire’ within Mons 2015 -Cultural Capital of Europe, associate curator in the ‘Arab Art Focus’ at Downtown Contemporary Arts Festival (D-CAF, Cairo) in 2016, and for the next show case within the Arab Art Focus at Edinburgh Fringe Festival (2017) . She is actively involved in projects involving young Arab dancers: dramaturgy of performances, research and documenting, curatorship and publications. She is regularly contributing for her specific expertise for public debates and discussions, in Europe and the Mena region.

 

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Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal is renowned for provoking dialogue about international politics and internal dynamics through high profile, technologically-driven projects that employ the use of robotics, the internet, and photographic mobile mapping. Bilal’s work is constantly informed by the experience of fleeing his homeland and existing simultaneously in two worlds – his home in the “comfort zone” of the U.S. and his consciousness of the “conflict zone” in Iraq. Using his own body as a medium, Bilal continues to challenge our comfort zone with projects like 3rdi, and Counting, Domestic Tension and 168:01. He lives and works in New York City.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Leila Buck is a Lebanese American playwright, actor, and intercultural facilitator who has lived, taught, performed and/or traveled in 11 Arab countries and around the world. She has performed her work and others at the Public Theater, New York Theatre Workshop, Cleveland Public Theatre, Mosaic theater at Arena Stage, and across the U.S.. A State Dept. Speaker Specialist and Cultural Envoy, she has performed, led master workshops and taught theatrical tools for literacy, conflict resolution, and intercultural communication to U.N. delegates, aid workers, youth, educators, and business and intercultural leaders across the U.S. and around the world. Her work is featured in American Theatre magazine, Innovation in Five Acts; Etching Our Own Image: Voices from the Arab American Art Movement, and Four Arab-American Plays. Public Theater’s inaugural Emerging Writers Group; Usual Suspect (NYTW); Adjunct Professor, The Middle East on Stage (NYU). www.leilabuck.com

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Marvin Carlson is the Sidney E. Cohn Distinguished Professor of Theatre, Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the Director of the Marvin Carlson Theatre Center at the Shanghai Theatre Academy, China. Carlson has a Ph.D. in drama and theatre from Cornell University. His wide-ranging research and teaching interests include dramatic theory and Western European theatre history, dramatic literature, and translation, especially of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. He has been awarded the ATHE Career Achievement Award, the George Jean Nathan Prize, the Bernard Hewitt prize, the George Freedley Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has been a Walker-Ames Professor at the University of Washington, a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies at Indiana University, a visiting professor at the Freie Universitat of Berlin, and a Fellow of the American Theatre. In 2005 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Athens. His best-known book, Theories of the Theatre (1993), has been translated into eight languages. His 2001 book, The Haunted Stage, won the Calloway Prize.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Peter Eckersall is the EO of Theatre & Performance Program, The Graduate Center, CUNY. A pioneering researcher in Japanese theatre and dramaturgy and contemporary performance, his recent publications include We’re People Who Do Shows: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility (coedited with Helena Grehan, Performance Research Books, 2013); Theatre and Performance in the Asia-Pacific: Regional Modernities in the Global Era (coauthored with Denise Varney, Barbara Hatley, and Chris Hudson, Palgrave, 2013); and Performativity and Event in 1960s Japan: City, Body, Memory (Palgrave, 2013). His current project New media dramaturgy: How new media transform the composition and reception of live performance is funded by the Australian Research Council. He is a visiting fellow in the Centre for Interweaving Performance Cultures, Berlin; resident dramaturg for Not Yet It’s Difficult, a contemporary performance group based in Melbourne; and coconvenor of the Dramaturgy and Performance Studies Working Group at Performance Studies International (PSi), and was cofounder of Dramaturgies.

 

Photo by Ann-Margaret Johnson

Yussef El Guindi’s recent productions include The Talented Ones at Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland (Santa Barbara Independent Indy Award); Our Enemies: Lively Scenes of Love and Combat at Golden Thread Productions (American Theatre Critics Association’s M. Elizabeth Osborn Award); and Threesome at Portland Center Stage, ACT, and at 59E59 (Portland Drammy for Best Original Script).

 

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Frank Hentschker (Executive Director, The Segal Center) who holds a Ph.D. in theatre from the now legendary Institute for Applied Theatre Studies in Giessen, Germany, came to the Graduate Center in 2001 as program director for the Graduate Center’s Martin E. Segal Theatre Center and was appointed to the central doctoral faculty in theatre in 2009. Among the vital events and series he founded at the Segal Center are the World Theatre Performance series, the annual fall PRELUDE Festival, and the PEN World Voices Playwrights Series. Before coming to The Graduate Center, Hentschker founded and directed DISCURS, the largest European student theater festival existing today; he acted as Hamlet in Heiner Müller’s Hamletmaschine, directed by Heiner Müller; created a performance with Joseph Beuys; performed in the Robert Wilson play The Forest (music by David Byrne) and worked for Robert Wilson. Next to programming Segal Theatre Center events Frank taught Theatre History at Columbia University and is currently working on a book about Robert Wilson’s play texts.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Rania Lee Khalil’s works in performance and moving image reflect on the beauty and fragility of wildlife and human (culture)s. Her performances have been seen at Judson Church, Utopia Station, Ontological-Hysteric Theater in New York; Aomori Art Museum Japan, Al Ma’mal Contemporary Art Jerusalem, Kiasma Museum, Helsinki, Zawya Cinema, Cairo and the artistic research pavilion of the 2015 Venice Biennale. She is presently completing a doctorate in artistic research at Theatre Academy Helsinki.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Amahl Khouri a queer and trans mixed race Jordanian documentary playwright and theatre maker based in Munich. Khouri is the author of several plays, including She He Me (Vienna 2019) and No Matter Where I Go (Beirut 2014). Khouri was a selected playwright at the Arcola Global Queer Plays and the Lark hotINK international play reading series. Khouri is also the recipient of a Rosenthal Emerging Voices fellowship from PEN USA and was member of the Lincoln Center Director’s Lab in 2013. Khouri’s work has been published in several U.S. journals and in the International Perspectives on Where Performance Leads Queer anthology.

 

Photo by Jodie Christopherson

Ashley Marinaccio is a theatre artist and scholar who creates work to challenge the status quo. She is dedicated to documenting the socio-political issues that define our times. As a director and playwright, her work has been seen offBroadway, at the White House, United Nations, TED conferences across the United States, Europe and Asia. Currently, Ash is working on her Ph.D. in the Department of Theatre and Performance at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is focusing on theatre and war. Ash is the founding Artistic Director of the theatre company and United Nations NGO Girl Be Heard, where she received numerous accolades, including LPTW’s Lucille Lortel Women’s Visionary Award. She is a co-founder/director of Co-Op Theatre East and member of the Civilians Field Research Team. Ash is on the faculty at Pace University and Hunter College.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Robert Myers (www.robert-myers.com) is a professor of English at AUB, director of the Alwaleed Center for American Studies and co-director of AUB’s Theater Initiative. He is the author of over fifteen plays, which have been produced all over the U.S., he has produced and worked as a dramaturg with Sahar Assaf on half a dozen plays in Lebanon and translated six plays from Arabic to English with Nada Saab. He is co-editor and co-translator with Nada Saab of Contemporary Political Theater from the Levant, forthcoming this year from Brill, and Sentence to Hope, a Sa’dallah Wannous reader, forthcoming from Yale University Press in 2019.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Rashi Mishra is a theatre practitioner and researcher from India, working at the intersection of theatre and politics. Rashi received an MA in Performance Studies from Tisch School of Arts, New York University and is a recipient of Gallatin Global Fellowship in Human Rights from NYU, as part of which Rashi have worked with The Freedom Theatre (Palestine) researching and writing about the role of theatre within the Human Rights discourse.

 

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Rubén Polendo (Founding Artistic Director, Theater Mitu) is a director, writer, and creative technologist whose practice and pedagogical work is situated in the tension between acting and performance, theatrical design and installation, and multimedia and interactive technology. His work with Theater Mitu has been presented and developed nationally and internationally. Polendo recently served as Founding Theater Program Director and Associate Dean for the Arts Center, both at NYU Abu Dhabi. Polendo is currently Chair of Undergraduate Drama at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Founded in 1997, Theater Mitu is a permanent group of collaborators committed to expanding the definition of theater through methodical experimentation with its form. The company investigates global performances as a source of their training, work, and methodologies.

 

Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post

Heather Raffo is an award-winning playwright and actress who’s work has taken her from the Kennedy Center to the US Islamic World Forum and from the Aspen Ideas Institute into hundreds of classrooms across our nation. She has been seen off Broadway, off West End in regional theater and in film. She is the author of 9 PARTS OF DESIRE (Lucielle Lortel award, Blackburn, Drama League, OCC, Helen Hayes nominations), which The New Yorker called “an example of how art can remake the world”; the librettist to the opera FALLUJAH (NYC Opera, Long Beach Opera); and her newest play, NOURA, (Weissberger Award) premieres at Playwrights Horizons in Nov/Dec this year.

 

Photo by Lisa Keating

Betty Shamieh is a Palestinian-American playwright and author of fifteen plays. Her productions include The Black Eyed (New York Theatre Workshop), Fit for a Queen (Classical Theatre of Harlem), and Roar (The New Group). Roar was the first play by a Palestinian-American playwright produced off-Broadway. A graduate of Harvard College and the Yale School of Drama, she was named a UNESCO Young Artist for Intercultural Dialogue and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her works have been translated into seven languages. www.bettyshamieh.com.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Sarah Youssef is an Egyptian-German internationally working freelance theatre maker and research scholar. She has completed her undergraduate studies in Theatre at the American University in Cairo, Egypt and her graduate degrees in Text and Performance Studies at RADA/King’s College London and in Cross Sectoral and Community Arts at Goldsmiths University. Since fall 2012, Sarah is editorial assistant of gender forum – An Internet Journal for Gender Studies and research assistant at the University of Cologne, Germany where she also teaches. Sarah has been a CUNY visiting research scholar in 2014 and 2017. She holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Cologne, Germany, where she completed her dissertation on her decade-long empirical research on UK and US prison theatre (forthcoming 2019, Intellect Publishing). She is currently working on her research as well as her practice on immersive theatre productions and the reimagining of classic texts in theatre and performance.

 

Photo by Annabel Guevara

Salma S. Zohdi is an Egyptian Dramaturg based in New York City, and was the 2017/2018 Next Generation Fellow at The Martin E. Segal Theatre Center. In Egypt, she worked as a producer, teaching artist, stage manager, playwright, translator, and assistant director. NYC credits: Nathan the Wise at CSC, The Mecca Tales, “Arab Classic Plays” and “Re-reading Oppression” at the Segal Center, and American Dreams & Arabian Nights at the BRICLab. Salma is also a collaborator on a work-in-development of a theatre adaptation of Dr Alaa El Aswany’s acclaimed Egyptian novel The Yacoubian Building. MA: AUC – English & Comparative Literature. MFA: Columbia University – Theatre (Dramaturgy).

 

Date: September 27, 2018
Venue: Room 9206
Category:
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September 28, 2018

Towards Arab Dramaturgies (Day 2)

Photo: Hunter Canning  World Premier of The Strangest. by Betty Shamieh, 2017, 4th Street Theater

Thursday, September 27th   
2:00pm–9:00pm Conference Room #9206, 9th floor

Friday, September 28th   
9:00am–6:00pm Skylight Room #9100, 9th floor

Free + Open to the public
First come, first served
Please RSVP here: mestc@gc.cuny.edu

We would like to invite you to participate and attend the upcoming  Towards Arab Dramaturgies symposium in New York City at the Graduate Center, CUNY, New York.

The 2018 symposium Towards Arab Dramaturgies is part of the exchange partnership between the Martin E. Segal Theater Center, the Ph.D. Program in Theatre and Performance at The Graduate Center CUNY and the Theater Initiative at the American University of Beirut (AUB). The symposium is organized and curated by Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall, Frank Hentschker and Salma S. Zohdi, with additional support from Sahar Assaf and Robert Myers.

 |About the Symposium|

With a focus in this symposium on Arabic dramaturgies, we hope to begin to answer these questions. As a term that bridges the ideas and practice of contemporary performance, dramaturgy draws our attention to the process of artistic production. It explores the notion that process is performance and invites us to look at the question of how artists connect ideas and forms in their work.

This symposium will feature research papers, artist talks and roundtable events. The sessions and papers will be compiled in a publication/book that will be generated from the discussions at the convening. The event will be live streamed and will be archived at the Segal Center’s Youtube page.

Contemporary theatre and performance in the Arabic world is a diverse and contested set of practices that are unfolding in a fast-changing political and culturally complex region. In this situation, the performing arts are under pressure to independently produce new work, uphold traditions— and simultaneously to speak about contemporary lives, nationalism, class, race, religion, gender and new forms of theatre. In this symposium, we ask how theatre can continue to grow, develop artistically and continue to be a voice in the future of the Arabic world. How can the theatre in the region thrive?

Scheduled speakers and panelists include: Khalid Amine, Eman Antar, Sahar Assaf, Dalia Basiouny, Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi,
Wafaa Bilal, Leila Buck, Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall,
Yussef El Guindi, Frank Hentschker, Rania Lee Khalil,
Amahl Khouri, Ashley Marinaccio, Robert Myers, Rashi Mishra, Rubén Polendo (Theatre Mitu), Heather Raffo, Betty Shamieh, and Sarah Youssef.

|Schedule|

Day 2, Friday, Sept, 28
(Skylight Room #9100, 9th floor)

9:00am – 9:50am             Registration/Coffee

10:00am –  11:30am        Arab Stages Advisory Board Session
Opening Remarks: Arab Dramaturgies: A Mutiplicity of Options
by Marvin Carlson
Introduction by Betty Shamieh
Conversation with Marvin Carlson and others / Q&A

11:30pm –  1:00pm         Theatre of the Real: Dramaturgy in the Arab Context
with Amahl Khouri, Theatre Mitu, Sahar Assaf, and Peter Eckersall / Q&A

1:00pm –  2:30pm            Lunch Break

 * 2:30pm –  4:00pm        Paper Presentations

  • Opening by Marvin Carlson: Arab Dramaturgy in Medieval Cairo: The Ibn Dāniyāl Trilogy
  • Khalid Amine: Alternative Arab Dramaturgies
  • Sarah Youssef: Arab Dramaturgies on the European Stage: Liwaa Yazji’s Goats (Royal Court, 2017), Mohammad Al-Attar’s The Factory (Ruhrtriennale, 2018)
  • Dalia Basiouny: Dramaturgies of the Revolution

* 4:00pm –  5:30pm        Arab American and Arab Artists in conversation
Opening by Yussef El Guindi
Conversation with Sahar Assaf, Dalia Basiouny, Leila Buck, Rania Khalil, Amahl Khoury, Heather Raffo, and Betty Shamieh.
Moderated by Frank Hentschker / Q&A

* 5:30pm –  6:00pm        Wrap up, Recap, and Conclusions by Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall, Frank Hentschker, Sahar Assaf, and Robert Myers

* Coffee and snacks in Green Room, Room 3111, 3rd Floor

For day 1 schedule, click here

 

 

About the Participants:

Photo courtesy of the artist

Khalid Amine is Senior Professor of Performance Studies at the Faculty of Letters and Humanities, Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Tetouan, Morocco. Among his published books: Beyond Brecht (1996), Moroccan Theatre Between East and West (2000), Fields of Silence in Moroccan Theatre (2004), Dramatic Art and the Myth of Origins: Fields of Silence (2007). Amine is Co-author with Distinguished Professor Marvin Carlson The Theatres of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia: Performance Traditions of the Maghreb (London & New York: Palgrave, 2012).

 

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Eman Mostafa Antar is a translator and master research scholar at the Department of English Language and Literature, Cairo University. Her main areas of research are visual, cultural and gender studies. In 2016, she participated in Dancing the Self, a contemporary dance workshop for women and in April 2017, she performed in a project entitled: (Un)Covered en Masse that was staged on Falaki theatre, Cairo, along with other 25 women. She is also a member of two creative writing &storytelling groups: Seshat and Ana Elhekaya. Now, she is a Fulbright foreign language teaching assistant (FLTA) of Arabic language in Northeastern University, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Boston, MA.

 

Photo by Rayan Ghannam

Sahar Assaf is an actress, stage director and Assistant Professor of Theatre at the American University of Beirut. She recently translated and directed Garcia-Lorca’s Blood Wedding as a site-specific performance and co-translated, co-directed and starred in Shakespeare’s King Lear. Sahar is a member of Lincoln Center Director’s Lab (2014), a member of Directors Lab North in Toronto (2017) and a Fulbright alumnus with an MA in Theatre Studies from Central Washington University (2011).

 

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Dalia Basiouny is an Egyptian writer, theatre maker, activist, academic and translator. Her theatre work includes directing 20 plays performed in Egypt, England, USA, Morocco, Iraq, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia and Germany. Basiouny’s theatre and academic work focuses on the role of women in theatre. Her Ph.D. from CUNY Graduate Center explores the political theatre of Arab American Women after 9/11. She established “Sabeel for the Arts” in Cairo,1997. This independent group promotes women’s work, explores non-traditional theatre settings, and new ways of telling women stories in theatre and on film. She is a recipient of many awards including the Fulbright Arts Grant, USA; the British Council Chevening Scholarship, UK; and the theatre award from the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture (AFAC) for her play “Solitaire”.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi born in Algiers and operating from Brussels, is a curator, dramaturge and documentary filmmaker. She was involved as guest curator in ‘Casablanca-Energienoire’ within Mons 2015 -Cultural Capital of Europe, associate curator in the ‘Arab Art Focus’ at Downtown Contemporary Arts Festival (D-CAF, Cairo) in 2016, and for the next show case within the Arab Art Focus at Edinburgh Fringe Festival (2017) . She is actively involved in projects involving young Arab dancers: dramaturgy of performances, research and documenting, curatorship and publications. She is regularly contributing for her specific expertise for public debates and discussions, in Europe and the Mena region.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal is renowned for provoking dialogue about international politics and internal dynamics through high profile, technologically-driven projects that employ the use of robotics, the internet, and photographic mobile mapping. Bilal’s work is constantly informed by the experience of fleeing his homeland and existing simultaneously in two worlds – his home in the “comfort zone” of the U.S. and his consciousness of the “conflict zone” in Iraq. Using his own body as a medium, Bilal continues to challenge our comfort zone with projects like 3rdi, and Counting, Domestic Tension and 168:01. He lives and works in New York City.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Leila Buck is a Lebanese American playwright, actor, and intercultural facilitator who has lived, taught, performed and/or traveled in 11 Arab countries and around the world. She has performed her work and others at the Public Theater, New York Theatre Workshop, Cleveland Public Theatre, Mosaic theater at Arena Stage, and across the U.S.. A State Dept. Speaker Specialist and Cultural Envoy, she has performed, led master workshops and taught theatrical tools for literacy, conflict resolution, and intercultural communication to U.N. delegates, aid workers, youth, educators, and business and intercultural leaders across the U.S. and around the world. Her work is featured in American Theatre magazine, Innovation in Five Acts; Etching Our Own Image: Voices from the Arab American Art Movement, and Four Arab-American Plays. Public Theater’s inaugural Emerging Writers Group; Usual Suspect (NYTW); Adjunct Professor, The Middle East on Stage (NYU). www.leilabuck.com

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Marvin Carlson is the Sidney E. Cohn Distinguished Professor of Theatre, Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the Director of the Marvin Carlson Theatre Center at the Shanghai Theatre Academy, China. Carlson has a Ph.D. in drama and theatre from Cornell University. His wide-ranging research and teaching interests include dramatic theory and Western European theatre history, dramatic literature, and translation, especially of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. He has been awarded the ATHE Career Achievement Award, the George Jean Nathan Prize, the Bernard Hewitt prize, the George Freedley Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has been a Walker-Ames Professor at the University of Washington, a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies at Indiana University, a visiting professor at the Freie Universitat of Berlin, and a Fellow of the American Theatre. In 2005 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Athens. His best-known book, Theories of the Theatre (1993), has been translated into eight languages. His 2001 book, The Haunted Stage, won the Calloway Prize.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Peter Eckersall is the EO of Theatre & Performance Program, The Graduate Center, CUNY. A pioneering researcher in Japanese theatre and dramaturgy and contemporary performance, his recent publications include We’re People Who Do Shows: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility (coedited with Helena Grehan, Performance Research Books, 2013); Theatre and Performance in the Asia-Pacific: Regional Modernities in the Global Era (coauthored with Denise Varney, Barbara Hatley, and Chris Hudson, Palgrave, 2013); and Performativity and Event in 1960s Japan: City, Body, Memory (Palgrave, 2013). His current project New media dramaturgy: How new media transform the composition and reception of live performance is funded by the Australian Research Council. He is a visiting fellow in the Centre for Interweaving Performance Cultures, Berlin; resident dramaturg for Not Yet It’s Difficult, a contemporary performance group based in Melbourne; and coconvenor of the Dramaturgy and Performance Studies Working Group at Performance Studies International (PSi), and was cofounder of Dramaturgies.

 

Photo by Ann-Margaret Johnson

Yussef El Guindi’s recent productions include The Talented Ones at Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland (Santa Barbara Independent Indy Award); Our Enemies: Lively Scenes of Love and Combat at Golden Thread Productions (American Theatre Critics Association’s M. Elizabeth Osborn Award); and Threesome at Portland Center Stage, ACT, and at 59E59 (Portland Drammy for Best Original Script).

 

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Frank Hentschker (Executive Director, The Segal Center) who holds a Ph.D. in theatre from the now legendary Institute for Applied Theatre Studies in Giessen, Germany, came to the Graduate Center in 2001 as program director for the Graduate Center’s Martin E. Segal Theatre Center and was appointed to the central doctoral faculty in theatre in 2009. Among the vital events and series he founded at the Segal Center are the World Theatre Performance series, the annual fall PRELUDE Festival, and the PEN World Voices Playwrights Series. Before coming to The Graduate Center, Hentschker founded and directed DISCURS, the largest European student theater festival existing today; he acted as Hamlet in Heiner Müller’s Hamletmaschine, directed by Heiner Müller; created a performance with Joseph Beuys; performed in the Robert Wilson play The Forest (music by David Byrne) and worked for Robert Wilson. Next to programming Segal Theatre Center events Frank taught Theatre History at Columbia University and is currently working on a book about Robert Wilson’s play texts.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Rania Lee Khalil’s works in performance and moving image reflect on the beauty and fragility of wildlife and human (culture)s. Her performances have been seen at Judson Church, Utopia Station, Ontological-Hysteric Theater in New York; Aomori Art Museum Japan, Al Ma’mal Contemporary Art Jerusalem, Kiasma Museum, Helsinki, Zawya Cinema, Cairo and the artistic research pavilion of the 2015 Venice Biennale. She is presently completing a doctorate in artistic research at Theatre Academy Helsinki.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Amahl Khouri a queer and trans mixed race Jordanian documentary playwright and theatre maker based in Munich. Khouri is the author of several plays, including She He Me (Vienna 2019) and No Matter Where I Go (Beirut 2014). Khouri was a selected playwright at the Arcola Global Queer Plays and the Lark hotINK international play reading series. Khouri is also the recipient of a Rosenthal Emerging Voices fellowship from PEN USA and was member of the Lincoln Center Director’s Lab in 2013. Khouri’s work has been published in several U.S. journals and in the International Perspectives on Where Performance Leads Queer anthology.

 

Photo by Jodie Christopherson

Ashley Marinaccio is a theatre artist and scholar who creates work to challenge the status quo. She is dedicated to documenting the socio-political issues that define our times. As a director and playwright, her work has been seen offBroadway, at the White House, United Nations, TED conferences across the United States, Europe and Asia. Currently, Ash is working on her Ph.D. in the Department of Theatre and Performance at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is focusing on theatre and war. Ash is the founding Artistic Director of the theatre company and United Nations NGO Girl Be Heard, where she received numerous accolades, including LPTW’s Lucille Lortel Women’s Visionary Award. She is a co-founder/director of Co-Op Theatre East and member of the Civilians Field Research Team. Ash is on the faculty at Pace University and Hunter College.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Robert Myers (www.robert-myers.com) is a professor of English at AUB, director of the Alwaleed Center for American Studies and co-director of AUB’s Theater Initiative. He is the author of over fifteen plays, which have been produced all over the U.S., he has produced and worked as a dramaturg with Sahar Assaf on half a dozen plays in Lebanon and translated six plays from Arabic to English with Nada Saab. He is co-editor and co-translator with Nada Saab of Contemporary Political Theater from the Levant, forthcoming this year from Brill, and Sentence to Hope, a Sa’dallah Wannous reader, forthcoming from Yale University Press in 2019.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Rashi Mishra is a theatre practitioner and researcher from India, working at the intersection of theatre and politics. Rashi received an MA in Performance Studies from Tisch School of Arts, New York University and is a recipient of Gallatin Global Fellowship in Human Rights from NYU, as part of which Rashi have worked with The Freedom Theatre (Palestine) researching and writing about the role of theatre within the Human Rights discourse.

 

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Rubén Polendo (Founding Artistic Director, Theater Mitu) is a director, writer, and creative technologist whose practice and pedagogical work is situated in the tension between acting and performance, theatrical design and installation, and multimedia and interactive technology. His work with Theater Mitu has been presented and developed nationally and internationally. Polendo recently served as Founding Theater Program Director and Associate Dean for the Arts Center, both at NYU Abu Dhabi. Polendo is currently Chair of Undergraduate Drama at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Founded in 1997, Theater Mitu is a permanent group of collaborators committed to expanding the definition of theater through methodical experimentation with its form. The company investigates global performances as a source of their training, work, and methodologies.

 

Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post

Heather Raffo is an award-winning playwright and actress who’s work has taken her from the Kennedy Center to the US Islamic World Forum and from the Aspen Ideas Institute into hundreds of classrooms across our nation. She has been seen off Broadway, off West End in regional theater and in film. She is the author of 9 PARTS OF DESIRE (Lucielle Lortel award, Blackburn, Drama League, OCC, Helen Hayes nominations), which The New Yorker called “an example of how art can remake the world”; the librettist to the opera FALLUJAH (NYC Opera, Long Beach Opera); and her newest play, NOURA, (Weissberger Award) premieres at Playwrights Horizons in Nov/Dec this year.

 

Photo by Lisa Keating

Betty Shamieh is a Palestinian-American playwright and author of fifteen plays. Her productions include The Black Eyed (New York Theatre Workshop), Fit for a Queen (Classical Theatre of Harlem), and Roar (The New Group). Roar was the first play by a Palestinian-American playwright produced off-Broadway. A graduate of Harvard College and the Yale School of Drama, she was named a UNESCO Young Artist for Intercultural Dialogue and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her works have been translated into seven languages. www.bettyshamieh.com.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Sarah Youssef is an Egyptian-German internationally working freelance theatre maker and research scholar. She has completed her undergraduate studies in Theatre at the American University in Cairo, Egypt and her graduate degrees in Text and Performance Studies at RADA/King’s College London and in Cross Sectoral and Community Arts at Goldsmiths University. Since fall 2012, Sarah is editorial assistant of gender forum – An Internet Journal for Gender Studies and research assistant at the University of Cologne, Germany where she also teaches. Sarah has been a CUNY visiting research scholar in 2014 and 2017. She holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Cologne, Germany, where she completed her dissertation on her decade-long empirical research on UK and US prison theatre (forthcoming 2019, Intellect Publishing). She is currently working on her research as well as her practice on immersive theatre productions and the reimagining of classic texts in theatre and performance.

 

Photo by Annabel Guevara

Salma S. Zohdi is an Egyptian Dramaturg based in New York City, and was the 2017/2018 Next Generation Fellow at The Martin E. Segal Theatre Center. In Egypt, she worked as a producer, teaching artist, stage manager, playwright, translator, and assistant director. NYC credits: Nathan the Wise at CSC, The Mecca Tales, “Arab Classic Plays” and “Re-reading Oppression” at the Segal Center, and American Dreams & Arabian Nights at the BRICLab. Salma is also a collaborator on a work-in-development of a theatre adaptation of Dr Alaa El Aswany’s acclaimed Egyptian novel The Yacoubian Building. MA: AUC – English & Comparative Literature. MFA: Columbia University – Theatre (Dramaturgy).

 

Date: September 28, 2018
Venue: SKYLIGHT ROOM
Category:
, ,

October 22, 2018

Vegard Vinge (Norway) + Ida Müller (Germany)

Photo courtesy of the artists.

Monday, October 22
Segal Theatre
10:00am Screenings + 6:30pm Artist Talk

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

The Segal Center is honored to welcome the notorious Norwegian/German theatre duo Vegard Vinge and Ida Müller in their first visit to the U.S. Throughout the last decade, Vinge and Müller have managed to scandalize European audiences through gothic somberness and seemingly naïve aesthetics. They often indulge in transgressive improvisation, body fluids, violence, masks, and excessive make-up to create a new and ironically monstrous Total-Work-of-Art.

Their shocking, delightful, and thoughtful defiling of the Ibsen corpus provided fresh perspectives and commentary on these classic texts, while creating an outrageously original theatre language. Their maximalist and extremist aesthetics have earned them multiple awards and invitations to Europe’s most prestigious stages, including their former artistic home, The Volksbühne Berlin. Throughout the day, Vinge and Müller will personally introduce premiere screenings of excerpts from all their work, including a new, widely anticipated film project.

All day screenings will include excerpts from Art Performance Videos, 2004-2005; A Doll’s House, Grusomhetens Tehatre Oslo, 2006; Ghosts, Ibsen, Black Box Teatre, Oslo, 2007; The Wildduck, Ibsen, The Bergen International Festival, 2009; John Gabriel Borkman, Ibsen, Volksbühne Berlin, 2012; Nationaltheater Reinickendorf, Berliner Festspiele, 2017; Untitled (in process), 2013-2015. Evening event will feature an introduction, entitled Fiction/Fetish, by Andrew Friedman.

 

Screening Schedule:

10:00am
A Doll’s House/ Ibsen
Grusomhetens Teater, Oslo | 2006 | 90 mins

11:30am
Ghosts / Ibsen
Black Box Teatre, Oslo | 2007 | 90 mins

1:00pm
The Wild Duck / Ibsen
Festspillene i Bergen, Bergen | 2010 | 60 mins

2:00pm
John Gabriel Borkman / Ibsen
Volksbühne, Berlin | 2012 | 90 mins

3:30pm
Nationaltheater Reinickendorf + Masterbuilder Solness / Ibsen
Berliner Festspiele, Berline | 2012 | 150 mins

 

 

Andrew Friedman is an assistant professor of theatre history at Ball State University and received his PhD in Theatre from the CUNY Graduate Center.  His articles on contemporary performance appear in Theatre Journal, Theater, Modernism/modernity, European Stages, Ibsen News and Comment, and the forthcoming collection, Postdramatic Theatre and Form. He is currently completing a manuscript about Vegard Vinge and Ida Müller’s Ibsen-Saga.

Date: October 22, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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October 24, 2018

Orhan Pamuk’s Snow: Staged Reading with Orhan Pamuk (Turkey)

Orhan Pamuk’s Snow. Photo © Jean Louis Fernandez

Wednesday, October 24
Elebash Recital Hall
6:30pm Reading + Discussion

SEATING EXTREMELY LIMITED
PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY
FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Nobel Prize laureate in Literature Orhan Pamuk called Snow “my first and last political novel.” Set in the small city of Kars in northeastern Turkey, it tells a story of violence and tension between political Islamists, soldiers, secularists, and Kurdish and Turkish nationalists. An international sensation, the novel has been adapted for the stage in France by Blandine Savetier and Waddah Saab. After the American Premiere staged reading, translated by Taylor Gaines, Pamuk joins in conversation with Frank Hentschker, Executive Director of the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center.

Orhan Pamuk, born 1952, is a Turkish novelist, screenwriter, and academic. One of Turkey’s most prominent novelists, his work has sold over thirteen million books in sixty-three languages, making him the country’s best-selling writer. Pamuk is the author of Silent House, The White Castle, The Black Book, The New Life, and The Museum of Innocence, among others. He is also the Robert Yik-Fong Tam Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, where he teaches writing and comparative literature. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2018.

After a master in performing arts in Paris and drawing studies, Blandine Savetier trained as an actress with Stanislas Nordey in France and Anatoli Vassiliev in Moscow and Paris. She joined Conservatoire National Supérieur des Arts Dramatiques in Paris in 2003-2004, where she was trained in theatre direction with André Engel, Bob Wilson, and Krystian Lupa. She has mostly directed contemporary works, by authors including Thomas Bernhard, Samuel Beckett, Fernando Pessoa, Jean Genet, and Orhan Pamuk. Her work has been shown in renowned theatres in France and Belgium, including Théâtre du Rond-Point and Théâtre National de la Colline in Paris, Théâtre National de Strasbourg, Théâtre National in Brussels. They have received enthusiastic reviews in national newspapers. Her production of The President by Thomas Bernhard won the critics’ choice award.Her theatrical adaptation of Orhan Pamuk’s novel Snow, after her 2017 production in the Théâtre National de Strasbourg and a tour in France, has drawn international attention and praise, with TV reports by ARTE, TV5 Monde, BBC and just had a tour of a month and a half in national theaters in China and in international festivals. In recognition of these achievements, the director of Théâtre National de Strasbourg, Stanislas Nordey, has appointed her as an associated director. Besides being a theatre director, Blandine Savetier has been teaching acting for more than 10 years, in some of the most renowned theatre schools in France.

Waddah Saab is a French-Lebanese writer and dramaturg, born and raised in Senegal. After completing his studies in Paris, he worked in the European civil service. Passionate about literature and theatre, he has worked on Blandine Savetier’s productions as a dramaturg since 2002, making writing and theatre his primary career in 2013. His first novel, Si je t’oublie Tambacounda, is in the process of publication. He now lives in Brussels.

Taylor Gaines is a translator and freelance copyeditor based in New York. After a BA in Drama and French from the University of Virginia, and an MA in Cultural Translation from the American University of Paris, Taylor was a literary intern at Studio Theatre in Washington, D.C., and a literary fellow at The Play Company. She recently participated in the Rencontres de Traduction workshop as part of the Dramaturgies en dialogue festival, hosted by the Centre des auteurs dramatiques in Montreal.

Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, Cultural Services of the French Embassy, New York, and CUNY Graduate Center Public Programs, with additional support by FACE Contemporary Theater. Co-produced by Taylor Gaines in collaboration with the Segal Center.

Supported by FACE Contemporary Theater, a program developed by FACE Foundation and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States with the support from the Florence Gould Foundation, Institut français -Paris, the French Ministry of Culture and private donors. Additional support for women artists has been provided by Fondation CHANEL.

     

 

Start: Oct 24, 2018
End: Oct 24, 2018
Venue: Elebash Recital Hall
Category:
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November 12, 2018

Japanese Playwrights Project (Day 1): Satoko Ichihara/Kristine Haruna Lee, Jun Tsutsui/Soraya Broukhim, Kuro Tanino/Mallory Catlett

Kuro Tanino’s Avidya – No Light’s Inn. Photo by Shinsuke Sugino

Monday, November 12
Segal Theatre
2:00pm, 5:00pm, 7:00pm Readings + Discussions

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

After the success of the first edition of the Japanese Playwrights Project (JPP) in 2007 once again the Segal Center brings some of the brightest, most innovative, and most engaging emerging playwrights from Japan to New York to develop their pieces through translation into English and public readings of the work. The Japan Playwrights Project plays an important role in introducing contemporary writing and dramaturgy from Japan to the US.

In 2018, the Japanese Playwrights Project is proud to present:

A Question of Faeries by Satoko Ichihara
Favonia’s Fruitless Fable by Satoko Ichihara
Isla, Isla, Isla! by Yudai Kamisato
Avidya – Hot Spring Junkies in Hell Valley by Kuro Tanino
Sokonaizu by Jun Tsutsui

The Japanese Playwrights Project 2018 was made possible by the generous support of the Japan Foundation, New York (Koji Nozaki, Sanae Tani, and Kenji Matsumoto). Additional support for English translations by the Japan Playwrights Association. The Japanese Playwrights Project 2018 was initiated and realized by Frank Hentschker and Aya Ogawa.

Board of Advisors – Japan: Peter Eckersall, Shintaro Fujii, Kako Kishimoto, Hiromi Maruoka, Aya Ogawa, Toshiki Okada, and Masahiko Yokobori.
Board of Advisors – New York: Peter Eckersall, Anne Erbe, Frank Hentschker, Andrew Kircher, Kate Loewald, Aya Ogawa, and Yoko Shioya.

Participants of the 2007 JPP included Masataka Matsuda, Akio Miyazawa, Toshiki Okada, and Mikuni Yanaihara. Josh Fox/International WOW Company; Dan Safer/Witness Relocation, Jay Scheib, and The Play Company each presented successful productions in New York theatres.

 

 

 

Monday, November 12 (Click here for Day 2 Schedule)

2:00pm Favonia’s Fruitless Fable (毛美子不毛話)
written by Satoko Ichihara
directed by Kristine Haruna Lee
translated by Aya Ogawa

“Me” is a female office worker who, obsessed with a strange rumor, comes wandering through a back alley night after night in search of real leather pumps. In the back alley she has a series of encounters with a variety of questionable characters: a distorted version of a male office worker who is a superior at her company, another “Me,” a middle-aged man who has a huge cock growing out of the middle of his chest, and a shifty salesman. A two-person play (1M, 1F) portraying life in the chaos of contemporary society. Nominated for the 61st Kunio Kishida Prize for Drama.

5:00pm Sokonaizu (ソコナイ図)
written by Jun Tsutsui
directed by Soraya Broukhim
translated by Tomoyuki Arai

It isn’t clear whether it’s the end of the year or the beginning of the year. Two women are lying still in a room. No one knows the size of it. They are sisters. The younger speaks, but with a voice in her mind, her mouth isn’t actually voicing a sound. She may find her older sister dead, so she’s afraid to speak to her and she is also afraid of realizing that she herself can’t possibly utter a word, which would mean she is dead. An official of the city where the sisters live has noticed their accident, but he doesn’t make an effort to help. The older sister dies and speaks to say that her life was very poor because of the enormous inheritance tax caused by the land left by their parents. Their parents had passed away suddenly. The younger sister only remains, still in her room without knowing whether she has seen the old year out or not and whether she is dead or not.

7:00pm Avidya – Hot Spring Junkies in Hell Valley
written by Kuro Tanino
directed by Mallory Catlett
translated by Mari Boyd

The play is set in an old hot spring inn, located deep in the mountains of Japan. The health spa has long been cherished by the local villagers as a place to rest and cure them of their ailments. However, it is fated to be torn down to make way for a new railroad. One day in 2015, as the autumn prepares to change into winter, a rather peculiar father and son arrive from Tokyo. They are puppeteers who have come to put on a show at the request of the inn-owner. The father is a dwarf while his son is a rather eerie, expressionless figure who always seems to be wearing a mask. With their client nowhere in sight, the father and son wait in vain at the inn. As evening comes and their means of returning home is lost, they are forced to spend the night. While the villagers are puzzled by the sudden visit of this eccentric father and son, they are also intrigued. In time, the villagers find the depths of their minds shaken, exposing their inner darkness.

About the Playwrights

Satoko Ichihara is playwright, director, and novelist. Born in 1988, she studied theater at J.F. Oberlin University. Ichihara narrates the absurdity of life and the vitality of humans who shine in the rankling world from the perspective of women, delivered mainly through monologues. While setting great value on the bodies of performers, she also emphasizes the expression of texts and their rhythms. Her works are carefully built as if from an outside perspective into the behaviors of humans and animals. She aims to immerse the audience in the vibrancy and the bounding pulse of life. In 2011, Satoko received the Aichi Arts Foundation Drama Award with the play Insects. In 2013, she was selected to stage Qlobe of Life Ⅱ as part of the Festival/Tokyo. In 2016, the novel Insects was released in the literary journal Subaru. In 2017, she was a finalist for 61st Kishida Kunio Playwriting award for Favonia’s Fruitless Fable and was invited to present Favonia’s Fruitless Fable at the Seoul Marginal Theater Festival. In 2018 Satoko became a Saison Foundation Junior Fellow Artist. qqq-qqq-qqq.com

 

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Kuro Tanino, a playwright and director, was born in 1976 in Toyama Prefecture. Kuro Tanino is the artistic director of Niwa Gekidan Penino as well as resident playwright and director. He is a Saison Foundation Senior Fellow. After launching Niwa Gekidan Penino while still a medical student in 2000, he has since written and directed all the company’s plays. He was nominated for the prestigious Kishida Kunio Drama Award in 2007 and 2008, and has received invitations to festivals around the world. He premiered Käfig aus Wasser in March 2015 in Germany, while Avidya: No Lights Inn won the Kishida Kunio Drama Award in 2016.

 

 

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Jun Tsutsui, born in Osaka in 1971, is a director, playwright and performer who leads dracom, an Osaka-based performance group. He received his MA at Osaka University of Arts in 1997, the Kyoto Art Center Performing Arts Award for his direction of dracom’s Moreuta in 2007 and The Saison Foundation’s Senior Fellow scholarship for 2014–2016. With dracom he has participated in such events as the International Showcase of Tokyo Performing Arts Market 2008, Emerging Artists Program of Festival/Tokyo 2010, Sound Live Tokyo 2014 in collaboration with Small Wooden Shoe (Toronto) and Nippon Performance Night 2017 at FFT (Düsseldorf). He has worked with such artists/groups as Akio Suzuki, Zan Yamashita, Noriyuki Kiguchi, Masataka Matsuda, Ishinha, Toenkai and Takatsuki Senior Theatre Company formed by amateur performers all older than 50, as well as on dance projects with Kyoto University of Art & Design and Dance Box (Kobe). He has been running a small space OPA_Lab in Settsu City, Osaka, where he regularly presents experimental productions including Rough Play, where performers collectively learn a full-length classical or contemporary play in a day and perform it relying only on their uncertain and unorganized memory.

 

About the Directors

Mallory Catlett is a creator and director of performance across disciplines from opera and music theater to plays and installation art. She is the founder of Restless NYC whose Obie Award winning production, This Was The End, was recently remounted at Mabou Mines. Work outside of Restless includes: visual artist Nene Humphrey’s Transmissions (2017) at Leslie Heller Gallery and Mika Karlsson’s opera The Echo Drift (Prototype Festival 2018). She is a member of the multi-disciplinary artist led performance venue The Collapsable Hole. In NYC her work has premiered at 3LD, HERE, PS122, Abrons, Chocolate Factory; featured at COIL, Prototype and BAM’s Next Wave; and toured internationally to Canada, France, UK, Ireland & Australia. She is a Foundation of Contemporary Arts 2015 Awardee and a 2016 Creative Capital Artist. She is an Assistant Professor in Theatre Arts at Stony Brook University.

 

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Kristine Haruna Lee is a theater maker whose work navigates non-linear playwriting, the practice and performance of auto-theory, and the construction of visually rich performance landscapes with her company harunalee, hailed by the New York Times as “So full of impulses and splendid, fractious energy”. Recent plays with harunalee include Memory Retrograde (The Public’s Under The Radar Festival), to the left of the pantry and under the sugar shack (La MaMa Club), and War Lesbian (Dixon Place TONY LGBT Critic’s Pick). Her play Suicide Forest directed by Aya Ogawa will premiere at the Bushwick Starr in February 2019. She’s a recipient of the MAP Fund Award, the Lotos Foundation Prize for Directing, New Dramatists Van Lier Fellowship, and has been a member of Interstate 73, The Public’s Devised Theater Working Group, Ars Nova Maker’s Lab, and BAX AIR. She is an affiliated artist with New Georges and currently in the Soho Rep Writer/Director Lab. MFA Brooklyn College for Playwriting with Mac Wellman and Erin Courtney, BFA NYU Tisch Experimental Theater Wing.

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Soraya Broukhim is a multidisciplinary artist, an actor, a director, a poet, a teacher & Ayurvedic healer. She has collaborated in creating new devised projects with The Living Theatre beside Judith Malina and core-members since 2010, with A Laboratory for Actor Training e.t.c. beside director Vernice Miller, Ripe Time, Williamstown Theatre Festival, O’Neill Playwright Conference, Drama League, Tofte Lake Center & National Theatre Institute. She is an Artistic Associate at the Living Theatre. And Development-Marketing Director at A.L.A.T. etc. Ms. Broukhim is also currently an adjunct professor at Fordham University Lincoln Center teaching majors Devised-Collaboration Theatre. She graduated from Fordham University at Lincoln Center, BAADA, NTI & St.Petersburg Arts Theatre Academy. For acting credits please go to www.sorayabroukhim.com

Start: Nov 12, 2018
End: Nov 12, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
,

November 13, 2018

Japanese Playwrights Project (Day 2): Yudai Kamisato/Tony Torn/Sarah Hughes, Satoko Ichihara/Kyoko Takenaka

Yudai Kamisato’s Isla, Isla, Isla! Photo © Yuta Fukitsuka

Tuesday, November 13
Segal Theatre
4:00pm, 7:00pm Readings + Discussions

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

After the success of the first edition of the Japanese Playwrights Project (JPP) in 2007 once again the Segal Center brings some of the brightest, most innovative, and most engaging emerging playwrights from Japan to New York to develop their pieces through translation into English and public readings of the work. The Japan Playwrights Project plays an important role in introducing contemporary writing and dramaturgy from Japan to the US.

In 2018, the Japanese Playwrights Project is proud to present:

A Question of Faeries by Satoko Ichihara
Favonia’s Fruitless Fable by Satoko Ichihara
Isla, Isla, Isla! by Yudai Kamisato
Avidya – Hot Spring Junkies in Hell Valley by Kuro Tanino
Sokonaizu by Jun Tsutsui

The Japanese Playwrights Project 2018 was made possible by the generous support of the Japan Foundation, New York (Koji Nozaki, Sanae Tani, and Kenji Matsumoto). Additional support for English translations by the Japan Playwrights Association. The Japanese Playwrights Project 2018 was initiated and realized by Frank Hentschker and Aya Ogawa.

Board of Advisors – Japan: Peter Eckersall, Shintaro Fujii, Kako Kishimoto, Hiromi Maruoka, Aya Ogawa, Toshiki Okada, and Masahiko Yokobori.
Board of Advisors – New York: Peter Eckersall, Anne Erbe, Frank Hentschker, Andrew Kircher, Kate Loewald, Aya Ogawa, and Yoko Shioya.

Participants of the 2007 JPP included Masataka Matsuda, Akio Miyazawa, Toshiki Okada, and Mikuni Yanaihara. Josh Fox/International WOW Company; Dan Safer/Witness Relocation, Jay Scheib, and The Play Company each presented successful productions in New York theatres.

 

 

 

Tuesday, November 13 (Click here for Day 1 schedule)

4:00pm Isla, Isla, Isla! (イスラ!イスラ!イスラ!)
written by Yudai Kamisato
directed by Sarah Hughes, performed by Tony Torn
translated by Aya Ogawa

On a fictitious island in the south, an island dictator addresses his countless soldiers before a battle. In part he recounts the story of how he, the king of the island himself, arrived on the island and encountered the first natives there. He goes on to describe the lengthy history of how he brought “civilization” to the island, and recounts his violent encounters with his rival, a monstrous bird of the island. Soon the island is wracked by a huge earthquake, followed by the arrival of a wave of foreigners. With the new inventions brought onto the island, the island itself is transformed irrevocably. The king’s words gradually become the voice of the island itself. With references to real historical events, this play portrays an epic and mythological reflection on colonization, immigration, culture and civilization.

7:00pm A Question of Faeries (妖精の問題)
written and directed by Satoko Ichihara
performed by Kyoko Takenaka with English subtitles by Aya Ogawa

The 2016 mass murder of disabled people that shook Japanese society to the core was the departure point for the playwright. The play turns a critical eye towards contemporary society’s value judgment on issues of ideology of eugenics, and the aging population. The play is comprised of three acts in three different styles (Act 1 as rakugo, a traditional Japanese stand-up comedy form; Act 2 as a music piece; and Act 3 a seminar) and performed primarily by a single performer. The second act requires live accompaniment by a pianist, featuring compositions by emerging composer Masashi Nukata (Tokyo Siokouji / nuthmique). The actor Kyoko Takenaka was the first Japanese actor to be accepted into Frances’ École nationale supérieure d’art dramatique de Montpellier as an actor. This performance for JPP is a simplified version of the full production and is performed by one main actor.

About the Playwrights

Photo courtesy of the artist

Yudai Kamisato is a director and playwright, and the head of Okazaki Art Theatre.
He was born in Peru in 1982 and in now based in Tokyo and Kawasaki. In his teens, he lived for a few years in the Republic of Paraguay and the United States of America. In 2006, he became the youngest person ever to win the first prize in the TOGA Directors Competition for his staging of Desire Caught by the Tail, a farcical play with a script by Pablo Picasso, and he won the prize for the Kishida Kunio Drama Award in 2018 with The Story of Descending the Long Slopes of Valparaíso which premiered in Kyoto Experiment 2017. He made his debut as a novelist in 2013. In October 2016, he undertook one year of residence in Buenos Aires, Argentina under the Program of Overseas Study for Upcoming Artists offered by the Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs. Between fiscal years 2011 and 2016, he served as a junior fellow of The Saison Foundation. More recently, he has been creating works that derive from heightened interest in his own identity and reflect deep insights into problems confronting immigrants and workers, the relationship between the individual and national identity, and communication with contemporary others.

Satoko Ichihara is a playwriter, director and novelist. Born in 1988. Studied theater at J.F. Oberlin University. Ichihara narrates the absurdity of life and the vitality of humans who shine in the rankling world from the perspective of women, delivered mainly through monologues. While setting great value on the bodies of performers, she also emphasizes the expression of texts and their rhythms. Her works are carefully built as if from an outside perspective into the behaviors of humans and animals, and aim to immerse the audience in the vibrancy and the bounding pulse of life. 2011, Receives the Aichi Arts Foundation Drama Award with the play “Insects” .2013, Serected to stage “Qlobe of Life Ⅱ” as part of the Festival/Tokyo. 2016, Released the novel “Insects” in the literary journal “Subaru”. 2017, Nominated for finalist of 61st Kishida Kunio Playwriting award for “Favonia’s Fruitless Fable”. Invited to present “Favonia’s Fruitless Fable” at the Seoul Marginal Theater Festival. 2018, Selected to The Saison Foundation Junior fellow Artist.

 

About the Directors

Sarah Hughes is a director and producer of theater and new media. She’s developed performances with artists such as Eliza Bent, Julia May Jonas / Nellie Tinder, MJ Kaufman, Sibyl Kempson, McFeely Sam Goodman, Chana Porter, Deepali Gupta, Cara Scarmack, Alaina Ferris, and Pablo Helguera. With Graham Sack, Geoff Sobelle & Sensorium she’s created VR & AR pieces for Tribeca Film Festival, New York Theatre Workshop, and The New York Times. She’s presented work at Abrons Arts Center, BAM Next Wave, JACK, The Bushwick Starr, Japan Society, PEN World Voices, Columbia University, and Prelude, among others. Sarah worked with Elevator Repair Service from 2007-14, assistant directing Gatz, The Select, Arguendo, Shuffle, and Fondly, Collette Richland, and she was Co-Artistic Producer of Target Margin Theater from 2015-17. www.sarahcameronhughes.com

Start: Nov 13, 2018
End: Nov 13, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
,

December 3, 2018

Parliament (1st NY Session) with Michael Kliën (Austria/US)

Photo courtesy of the artist.

 

Monday, December 3
Segal Theatre
4:30pm Closed Participatory Event* + 8:30pm Artist Talk

FREE  + Open to public. First come, first served.

Reservation Required

The participatory event will be closed to audiences, to participate please RSVP corytamler@gmail.com                                                                  

The Segal Center is proud to present the CUNY version of Parliament (1st NY Session). Parliament is a pioneering work of situational choreography and exploration of ecological aesthetics. The work offers participants a critically needed withdrawal from normal modes of social action and provides instead an innovative site for 21st-century experimentalist cooperation. Embedded in the immediacy of Michael Kliën’s choreographic framework, citizen-performers, working in silence, come together to bear witness to and hold council amidst the elemental phenomena and fundamental concerns of collectively lived experience. Pointing towards unseen and unexperienced modes of social organization, Parliament traverses, probes and navigates the paradigms that animate our present-day political relations.

Produced in collaboration with Cory Tamler.

Photo courtesy of the artist

Michael Kliën (born 1973) is a choreographer and artist. Considered one of Europe’s most notable thinkers in contemporary dance and choreography, he has been commissioned by leading institutions including Ballett Frankfurt, Martha Graham Dance Company, New Museum, Irish Museum of Modern Art, and Hayward Gallery. As Artistic Director/CEO of Daghdha (2003-2011, Ireland) he developed an extended, socio-politically engaged choreography referred to as ‘Social Choreography’. Kliën’s practice encompasses interdisciplinary thinking, writing, curation, and centrally, choreographic works equally at home in performing and fine arts. He was awarded a PhD from Edinburgh College of Art in 2009. In 2017 Kliën took up the position of Associate Professor of Practice at Duke University.

Start: Dec 3, 2018
End: Dec 3, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
,

December 13, 2018

Teatro delle Albe (Italy): Artist Talk with Marco Martinelli

Photo by Lidia Bagnara.

Thursday, December 13
La MaMa Theater – Downstairs Theatre (66 4th Street, New York)

6:30pm Artist Talk

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Join us for an artist talk with Marco Martinelli and a reading by Ermanna Montanari from Teatro delle Albe’s latest production, Love’s Faithful (fedeli d’amore) – A Polyptych in Seven Panels for Dante Alighieri (Fedeli d’Amore). The unusual participatory work is a reflection by Marco Martinelli “about” Dante Alighieri and the contemporary world. Dante, himself a refugee, fled from Florence when he was condemned to death by burning at the stake. We meet Dante on his deathbed in 1321, exiled in Ravenna, the home of the Teatro delle Albe.

This “polyptych” for the stage enriches the itinerary by Martinelli and Montanari on The Divine Comedy, a project from 2017 to 2021 where the whole city is a stage and all citizens are called on to participate.

 

Photo courtesy by artist

Marco Martinelli, playwright and director, founded with Ernanna Montanari the Teatro delle Albe (1983), one of the most respected Italian theatre companies. Martinelli has been awarded numerous prizes including: five Ubu Prizes; the Drammaturgia In/Finita Prize; the Hystrio Prize; the Golden Laurel-international Festival Mess; the Prize for Career Achievement- international festival Journées théâtrales de Carthage.His texts have been published and staged in Italy, France (selected by the European projects on contemporary playwriting Face à Face and Fabulamundi), Belgium, Germany, Romania, Slovakia, Chile, Brazil and the United States (translated in English by Thomas Simpson).

Ermanna Montanari, actress, author and set designer, Teatro delle Albe’s founder and artistic director with Marco Martinelli, for her work and in particular for her extraordinary itinerary of vocal and musical research, has been awarded prestigious acknowledgements including: three Ubu Prizes, the Golden Laurel-international Festival Mess; the Lo straniero Prize-dedicated to the memory of Carmelo Bene; the Eleonora Duse Prize, and the Prize of the Associazione Nazionale Critici di Teatro.

Presented in collaboration with Umanism, Italian Playwright Project, Valeria Orani (Director) with additional support from La MaMa, Mia Yoo, Artistic Director, and the Italian Cultural Insitute.
Media partner Rai Radio3

     

Start: Dec 13, 2018
End: Dec 13, 2018
Venue: LaMaMa- The Downstairs, 66 4th Street, New York, NY
Category:
,

April 8

Fritz Kater’s Heiner 1-4 (Berliner Ensemble) with Brigitte Maria Mayer and Anna Müller. A Celebration of Heiner Müller’s 90th Birthday

Monday, April 8
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Reading + Panel

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Join us in celebrating in Heiner Müller’s 90th birthday with a reading of Heiner 1-4, by German playwright Fritz Kater. Kater arranged Müller Material on what echoes in play: the love story between the late Heiner Müller and his wife Brigitte Maria Mayer, using interview excerpts on art, theatre, and society from the post-revolutionary years, as well as “a play in the play with a monologue about life, the end and all the rest.”

 

Photo by Jack Zipes

Heiner Müller (9 January 1929 – 30 December 1995) was a German (formerly East German) dramatist, poet, writer, essayist and theatre director. His enigmatic, fragmentary pieces are a significant contribution to postmodern drama and postdramatic theatre. He is considered by many to be the most significant German writer for the theatre since  Bertolt Brecht.

 

 

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Brigitte Maria Mayer, born 1965 in Regensburg, is a German photographer, filmmaker, and producer. Her work engages with mythological and historic material and re-contextualizes aspects of modernity, religion, trauma and sexual identities. Mayer works and lives in Berlin.

 

 

 

Photo by Matthias David

Anna Müller completed Cultural Studies in Frankfurt (Oder), worked at a photo agency and is the co-founder of the small independent Berlin Publishing House Herzstückverlag (Heart Piece Publishing).

 

 

 

 

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Jonathan Kalb has taught at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center since the early 1990s. He is the Resident Dramaturg of Theatre for a New Audience and the creator and moderator of the public event series TheaterMatters: An Artists and Critics Review Panel at The Invisible Dog Art Center. He served for six years as Chair of Hunter’s Theatre Department, founded HotReview.org [hotreview.org] (The Hunter On-Line Theater Review) and edited it for 13 years, and has twice received the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism as well as the George Freedley Memorial Award from the Theatre Library Association. He has been a regular critic for The New York Times, The Village Voice and New York Press. He currently writes about theater on his TheaterMatters blog, which may be found at www.jonathankalb.com [jonathankalb.com]

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Bonnie Marranca is founding publisher and editor of the Obie-Award winning PAJ Publications/PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art. A recent recipient of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education Excellence in Editing Award for Sustained Achievement, she has written or edited eighteen books. She is the author  Performance Histories, Ecologies of Theatre, and Theatrewritings, and editor of several drama, interview and essay collections, including Conversations with Meredith Monk, New Europe: plays from the continent, Interculturalism and Performance, and Plays for the End of the Century. Her essays have been translated into twenty languages. A Guggenheim Fellow and Fulbright Senior Scholar, Bonnie Marranca is Professor of Theatre at The New School for Liberal Arts/Eugene Lang College.

 

German stage director Armin Petras is the artistic director of Staatsschauspiel Stuttgart. He studied stage direction at the Ernst Busch Academy of Dramatic Arts in Berlin from 1985 to 1987. In 1987, he co-founded the independent theatre company Medea Ost and staged Heiner Müller’s Wolokolamsker Chaussee 1-3 at Nordhausen Theatre. In 1988, he emigrated to the West Germany and started working as assistant director at Theater am Turm in Frankfurt and Münchner Kammerspiele. Petras is the most important director of plays written by playwright Fritz Kater, his Alter Ego. Petras staged Fritz Kater‘s Zeit zu lieben zeit zu sterben, a play for which the playwright received the Drama Award of Mülheim and was elected “Dramatist of the year“ in an annual survey carried out by the theatre journal “Theater Heute”.

Co-curated with Antje Oegel, Berlin.

Start: Apr 8, 2019
End: Apr 8, 2019
Venue: Segal Theatre
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April 27

Coffeehouse Chronicle: Witkacy

illus. Marta Przybył

Saturday, April 27
LaMaMa Ellen Stewart Theatre & The Downstairs
66 East 4th Street
(btw. Bowery & 2nd Ave)

3:00pm Readings + Panel            

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Coffeehouse Chronicle #153 will focus on the work of turn-of-the-century Polish avant-garde playwright Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz (1885 –1939), known as “Witkacy,” who may well have been Europe’s most radical novelist, dramatist, painter, and philosopher in an era when artists competed fiercely to break away from all that had come before. Writing in Polish yet banned in Communist Poland, Witkacy may not have gained the international attention of the Surrealists, Dadaists, or other Absurdists, but his work remains a striking example of modernism.

Witkacy wrote over 30 plays between 1918 and his suicide in 1939. Despite his productivity, he was practically ignored in his time and left behind no direct disciples, yet mysteriously, has gone on to stir up more excitement among young playwrights than practically any other 20th-century writer, Eugene O’Neill notwithstanding. His influence is perhaps amplified by the enthusiasm of European scholars, but his status as progenitor of the Avant Garde is undeniable. His plays were rediscovered in the 1950s and ‘60s, when they were hailed as precursors of the European theatrical movement known as the Theater of the Absurd. Witkiewicz is known for his outrageously extravagant scenes influenced by all kinds of occultisms and philosophical speculations.

This edition of Coffeehouse Chronicles will include a panel discussion about Witkacy with invited guests: Jadwiga Kosicka-Gerould (writer and translator); Krystyna Lipinska-Illakowicz (Lecturer at Yale University’s Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures); Daniel Pinchbeck (writer); Natalia Korczakowska (theater director and Artistic Director of Warsaw’s Studio Theater); and Eri Nox (playwright).
The panel will be moderated by the Director of CUNY’s Segal Theater Center, Frank Hentschker.

This edition will also include four short stage readings directed by Zenon Kruszelnicki (Gyubal Wahazar), Daniel Irizarry (The Madman and the Nun), Natalia Korczakowska (Narcotics: Peyote), Eri Nox (They).

The afternoon also celebrates GC CUNY’s Segal Theatre Center’s most ambitious publishing project to date: four volumes of Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz’s Collected Plays. The anthology represents the very first complete edition of his 23 extant plays in English translation, including The Madman and the Nun, The Crazy Locomotive, The Water Hen, The Shoemaker, They, The Pragmatists, Tumor Brainiowicz, Gyubal Wahazar, The Anonymous Work, The Cuttlefish, The Beelzebub Sonata, and others. Thanks to this major event, Witkacy’s groundbreaking work is finally available to a global audience. The late CUNY theatre scholar Daniel Gerould (1928-2012) provided lively and well-researched translations paired with contextual introductions. The work is edited by Jadwiga Kosicka-Gerould (Gerould’s wife) and Frank Hentschker of the Segal Center. Graphic design and typography are by Grzegorz Laszuk & Anna Hegman; Biuro Warsaw.

La Mama Theater’s Coffeehouse Chronicles is an educational performance series exploring the history and development of Off-Off Broadway from its inception within the Village “Coffeehouse Theatres” of the 1960s through today. Part artist portrait, part creative event, part history lesson, part community forum, its mission is to continue the work of its founder Ellen Stewart by providing a home for personal and intimate engagement with art.

 

 

                

Start: Apr 27, 2019
End: Apr 27, 2019
Venue: LaMaMa Ellen Stewart Theatre & The Downstairs
Category:
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May 6

The Segal Center & PEN World Voices present WORLD VOICES INTERNATIONAL PLAY FESTIVAL

The Martin E. Segal Theatre Center presents World Voices: International Play Festival 2019. As part of the 2019 PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature, the Segal Center presents play readings with some of the most significant theatre artists from Germany, all connected to the Gorki Theater in Berlin—a safe haven for immigrant, refugee and international theatre artists in Europe.

The International Play Festival generates a conversation on art, politics, dreams, war, and philosophy, meant to give American audiences a rich awareness of the greater global dialogue.

All readings will be followed by a discussion with the playwright. TBC.

2019 Participants:
Nora Abdel-Maksoud, Sibylle Berg, Necati Öziri, Falk Richter, Yael Ronen, and Sivan Ben-Yishai  Christopher-Fares Köhler (Artistic Consultant, Gorki) and Dmitrij Schaad.

May 6, 7, 8, 9 PEN World Voices: International Play Festival

May 6 | 6:30pm with leaders of the Gorki Theater, Berlin: Christopher-Fares Köhler, Dmitrij Schaad and Sivan Ben-Yishai
May 7 | 4pm + 6:30pm Sivan Ben-Yishai: Daddy Loves You + Yael Ronen: A Walk on The Dark Side  
May 8 | 4pm + 6:30pm Nora Abdel-Maksoud: The Making Of + Falk Richter: Small Town Boy
May 9 | 4pm + 6:30pm Necati Öziri: Get Deutsch or Die Tryin’ + Sibylle Berg: The So-Called Outside Means Nothing to Me

The PEN World Voices: International Play Festival 2019 has been made possible by the support of Susan and Jack Rudin(†), The Hearst Foundation, and Marvin Carlson, Sidney E. Cohn Chair, The Graduate Center CUNY. The PEN World Voices: International Play Festival was conceived, created, and curated by Frank Hentschker since 2007 in collaboration with PEN World Voices Festival.

The 2019 Festival is produced by Mike LoCicero, in collaboration with Frank Hentschker.

Founded by Michael Roberts, Esther Allen, and Salman Rushdie in the aftermath of September 11, 2001, PEN World Voices is the only international literary festival in the world with a human rights focus. It attracts the world’s best-known writers and has garnered broad global acclaim as one of the world’s premier literary events. Since its founding, PEN World Voices has presented more than 1,500 writers and artists from 118 countries, speaking 56 languages. www.penworldvoices.org

Chip Rolley, Director, World Voices Festival, PEN America
Kim Chan, General Manager

Start: May 6, 2019
End: May 9, 2019
Venue: segal theatre
Category:
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May 6

PEN World Voices: International Play Festival The Gorki Theater, Berlin Christopher-Fares Köhler

Monday, May 6
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Panel

Free & open to public. First come, first served

Join Frank Hentschker in conversation with the Gorki Theater’s Christopher-Fares Köhler (Artistic Consultant).

The Gorki Theater focuses on conflicts of a diverse society with attention to themes like migration, queerness, refuge, exile, and feminism. They ask: “What is the place of theatre in a society in transition? What work should theatre artists, faced with a permanent crisis in economy and politics, produce to reflect the severe social and cultural conflicts in our societies on the stage?” Join us to learn more about the unique and groundbreaking vision of one of the important theatres of the City of Berlin.

 

photo by André Wunstorf

Christopher-Fares Köhler, born in 1987, he was Falk Richter’s assistant dramaturge for productions such as Small Town Boy at the Maxim Gorki Theater Berlin and to Rimini Protokoll at Theater Oberhausen. He worked for the dramaturgy department at the Münchner Kammerspiele, Theater der Welt Festival 2017 in Hamburg, for the Zürcher Theaterpektakel, the Theater an der Ruhr, the Boat People Project, the Volksbühne Berlin, Münchner Kammerspiele and others. Since May 2018 he has been a dramaturge of the Exil Ensemble at the Maxim Gorki Theater and artistic assistant to the co-director Jens Hillje.

 

Following panel discussion with Christopher-Fares Köhler, Sivan Ben-Yishai, and Dmitrij Schaad. Moderated by Frank Hentschker.

Start: May 6, 2019
End: May 6, 2019
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
, , , ,

May 7

PEN World Voices: International Play Festival Yael Ronen and Sivan Ben-Yishai

Tuesday, May 7
Segal Theatre
4:00pm + 6:30pm Readings + Panels 

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served

4:00pm Daddy Loves You
Written by Sivan Ben-Yishai
Directed by: Tina Satter

A high speed train approaches an unknown destination through the dark night under the earth. Nine older women are sitting neatly in a row on a bench on the train. The further the train speeds along, the more painful the memories become. The passengers recount the wars they survived, motherhood, sexual abuse and more.

6:30pm A Walk On The Dark Side
Written by Yael Ronen.
Translated by Anna Galt
Directed by Sarah Hughes

When astrophysicist, Immanuel, is awarded a significant prize, his wife, Mania, invites his brother for a trip. Mathias, also an astrophysicist and a rival, brings his girlfriend Magda along, who just attempted suicide. Dark matter against dark energy, structural harmony against a chaos that explodes the system.

 

Photo by Esra Rotthoff

Yael Ronen, in-house Gorki director, was born in Jerusalem in 1976. She comes from a theatre family and is internationally considered as one of the most exciting theatre makers of her generation. The greatest tool at her disposal is black humor in the framework of historical conflicts. Along with the Austrian Nestroy Theatre Prize and numerous other awards, she received the 2014 Europe Prize for Theatrical Realities.

 

 

 

Photo by Merav Maroody

Sivan Ben-Yishai studied theatre direction and dramatic writing in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem before joining the Nissan Nativ Acting Studio and Centre for Improvisation in Tel Aviv. For the past five years, Ben-Yishai has been based in Berlin, where she works as an author, director, and leader of workshops for dance and performance students. In 2013, Ben-Yishai won the Assitej competition in the category Best Show, Best Play, and Best Direction of the Year in Israel.

 

 

Readings followed by a conversation with Sivan Ben-Yishai.

Start: May 7, 2019
End: May 7, 2019
Venue: segal theatre
Category:
, , , ,

May 8

PEN World Voices: International Play Festival Nora Abdel-Maksoud and Falk Richter

Wednesday, May 8
Segal Theatre
4:00pm + 6:30  Reading + Panels

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served

4:00pm The Making Of
Written by Nora Abdel-Maksoud
Translated by Corinne Hundleby (Panthea)
Directed by Sibyl Kempson

A film director wants to put together a superhero remake, made in Germany. But some crew members aren’t quite ready for the pressure of their roles. A wicked satire about the film business and theatrical ideals, a desperate hosanna to the paradox of acting and an optimistic swan song for roles that no one can really fulfill.

6:30pm Small Town Boy
Written by Falk Richter
Translated by David Tushingham
Directed by Nic Benacerraf

What happens when young men leave the patriarchy behind? Is it possible to be a different kind of man? A different kind of woman? How will we define family, nation and belonging in the future? “You leave in the morning with everything you own… Run away, turn away, run away, turn away, run away” (Bronski Beat)

Readings followed by a conversation with the playwright.

 

Photo by Jan Krattiger

Nora Abdel-Maksoud was born in Munich in 1983 and began to study acting in 2005 at the Konrad Wolf Academy of Film and Television in Potsdam. She has worked extensively as an actor for stage and screen, and received the 2017 Kurt Hübner Director’s Award for The Making of. Also in 2017, she was named “Newcomer Director of the Year” by the German theater magazine TheaterHeute.

 

 

Photo by Esra Rotthoff

Falk Richter was born in 1969, in Hamburg, where he later studied philosophy and theatre direction. He is among the most important German playwrights and theatre directors of his generation. Since 1994, he has worked at renowned theatres across Europe, staging operas, his own works, and classic plays. Next to the Friedrich-Luft Prize, numerous awards, and a teaching position at the Ernst Busch Academy of Dramatic Arts in Berlin, Richter has been named a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in France.

 

Readings followed by a conversation with Nora Abdel-Maksoud.

Start: May 8, 2019
End: May 8, 2019
Venue: segal theatre
Category:
, , ,

May 9

PEN World Voices: International Play Festival Necati Öziri and Sibylle Berg

Thursday, May 9
Segal Theatre
4:00pm + 6:30pm Readings + Panels

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served

4:00pm Get Deutsch or Die Tryin’
Written by Necati Öziri
Translated by Anna Galt
Directed by Ashley Tata

There are moments in which everything comes together. Arda Yilmaz’s
18th birthday, for example, where she searches for the fragments of a
language that recalls memories of childhood in Almanya and a German-
Turkish family history amidst the turmoil of “guest” work and the Turkish
putsch. Above else, Arda is searching for an unknown father. A fade-out
on the last track of the record of your life.

6:30pm And Now, The World!
Written by Sibylle Berg
Translated by Ben Knight
Directed by Andy Goldberg

Evening. A young woman alone in her apartment. Friends Skype her and
send chats, text messages arrive, her mother calls. A few floors below, in
the basement: a man is tied and gagged. Young women’s fears, desires,
and obsessions with success are expressed in their media-saturated lives
–but how do they actually want to live their lives?

 

Photo provided by artist

Sibylle Berg was born in Weimar and now lives in Zurich. Her columns, novels, and plays are merciless in their narrations of misfortunes and the people that fall into them. She has been honored with multiple awards, including the Egon-Erwin-Kisch Prize and the Kassel Literary Prize.

 

 

 

Photo by Esra Rotthoff

Necati Öziri, born in 1988, studied philosophy, German studies, and literature in Bochum, Istanbul, Olsztyn and Berlin. Öziri worked as a dramaturg at Gorki Theater and writes short stories and theatre plays. In the theatrical season of 2014-2015, he was the artistic director of Gorki’s StudioЯ. Öziri is currently dramaturg at the Berliner Festspiele, where he directs the International Forum of the Theatertreffen.

 

 

 

photo courtesy of the artist

Dmitrij Schaad was an ensemble member at the Bochum Theatre from 2010-13. In 2011 he was awarded the Bochum Theater Prize and was honoured at the NRW Theatretreffen festival as best young actor. Since the 2013/2014 season Dimitrij Schaad has been a member of the Gorki Theatre’s ensemble. In 2014, the critics in the annual survey from the Theater heute journal selected him as the young actor of the year. At the Gorki he performs in, among others, Der Russe Ist Einer Der Birken Liebt (All Russians Love Birch Trees), Das Kohlhaas-Prinzip (The Kohlhaas Principle), The Situation and Denial, all directed by Yael Ronen. He also appears in the recent Gorki production Get Deutsch Or Die Tryin’ by Necati Öziri, directed by Sebastian Nübling. In 2016 he won a student Oscar for the film Invention of Trust, directed by his brother Alex Schaad.

Start: May 9, 2019
End: May 9, 2019
Venue: segal theatre
Category:
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May 16

Japanese Contemporary Theatre Magazine Launch and Panel Discussion

The Cast of KEREN. Photo by Shin Kurokawa

Thursday, May 16
Segal Theatre
4:00pm Panel

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served

American Theatre Magazine’s latest special edition focuses on the Japanese theatre scene today. Join guest editor/curator, Cindy Sibilsky and an esteemed array of panelists including Yoko Shioya (Japan Society), Kumiko Yoshii (Gorgeous Entertainment), Professor Kyoko Iwaki (Waseda University) and others, moderated & hosted by Frank Hentschker. The lively discussion (with photos and video) will explore current trends in Japanese contemporary theatre in Japan and abroad, including: Anime & Manga onstage, non-human entities such as robots and ghosts post-Fukushima, upcoming events, future predictions and more.

Link to American Theatre Magazine Special Edition on Japanese Theatre: https://www.americantheatre.org/category/special-section/theatre-in-japan/

 

Start: May 16, 2019
End: May 16, 2019
Category:
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May 20

New Theatre from Spain with Luz Arcas

Luz Arcas in La Phármaco’s Una gran emoción política 30 © Virginia Rota

Monday, May 20
Segal Theatre
4:00pm Readings / 6:30pm Panel + Performance

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served

New Theatre from Spain presents the works of Spanish contemporary artists
who defy the boundaries between disciplines, including Angélica Liddell, Sara Molina, Marc Caellas, and companies La Tristura, La Phármaco, and Vértebro.  Curated by Mara Valderrama, Ana Sánchez Acevedo, Daniel Valtueña, and Alexandra Viteri Arturo.

Positioned at the avant-garde of contemporary stage practices, these artists combine elements from theatre, dance, performance art, and visual arts, blurring the limits of playwriting and performing, and challenging the status of the text as the center of the theatrical experience. The event will feature reading-installations of works curated and newly translated by doctoral students of the Theatre and Performance Department and the Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Cultures Department at The Graduate Center, CUNY. The evening will conclude with a performance by dancer and choreographer Luz Arcas.

Luz Arcas is a dancer and choreographer. Since 2009, she is founder and
director of the dance company La Phármaco with Abraham Gragera. She has received the Critic’s Eye Prize for Dance, the Best Female Dancer Award at the Lorca Awards, and she was a finalist for Best Female Dancer at the Max
Awards. Her work explores ideas of ceremony, where all theatrical languages
combine into a discourse led by dance.

Start: May 20, 2019
End: May 20, 2019
Venue: segal theatre
Category:
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