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May 2

Lincoln Center Theater Directors Lab with Anne Cattaneo

2017 Directors Lab. Photo by Joan Marcus.

Wednesday, May 2
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Discussions

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Join us to discover and celebrate the astounding work and legacy of the Lincoln Center Theater Directors Lab, an international developmental program for emerging directors from many theatrical traditions. Since the inaugural lab in 1995, the LCT Directors Lab has nurtured the talents of over 1,500 emerging directors from around the world through workshops, shared sessions, rehearsals, and discussions with master artists under the leadership of dramaturg Anne Cattaneo. Anne Cattaneo and members of previous Labs will discuss the intensive investigation of their craft and the collaborative relationships developed through the program. A discussion with past and present Directors Lab collaborators.

Start: May 2, 2018
End: May 2, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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May 10

Objects of Study: Methods and Materiality in Theatre and Performance Studies

Thursday, May 10th
Segal Theatre
7:30pm Performance, 5:00pm Roundtable + All Day Conference

FREE + Open to public. Please RSVP.

The multiple potential meanings of “object” within theatre and performance studies point to questions about the relationship between knowledge and materiality. With this conference, we issue a challenge to the common understanding of scholarly work as focused on an “object of study.” We seek to destabilize the terms “object” and “study” to explore how the ways in which we conceive of objects and materiality might influence the framework of our discipline. Are we, as scholars, engaging in acts of objectification? How do the objects also act upon us?

This student conference is organized by the Doctoral Theatre Students’ Association and will host working groups of emerging scholars during the day, followed by a roundtable with Katherine Behar (Baruch College, CUNY), Maaike Bleeker (Utrecht University, Netherlands), Rebecca Schneider (Brown University), Soyoung Yoon (The New School), and a performance by Larissa Velez Jackson (LVJ Performance Co.).

For more information, please visit the webpage: cuny.is/objects

This event will take place thanks to the generous support of Sidney E. Cohn Chair Distinguished Professor Marvin Carlson, Vera Mowry Roberts Chair Distinguished Professor David Savran, Lucille Lortel Chair Professor Jean Graham-Jones, the Ph.D. Program in Theatre, Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, The Center for the Humanities, and The Doctoral Students’ Council.

DTSA Conference Committee: Eylül Fidan Akıncı, Amir Farjoun, Sarah Lucie, Christine Snyder, and Cory Tamler.

Date: May 10
Venue: Segal Theatre
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May 21

Hilton Als “Andy Warhol: The Series”

 

Left: Hilton Als, photo by Brigitte Lacombe.          Right: John Jesurun, photo by Paula Court.

Monday, May 21
Segal Theatre
5:00pm Staged Reading

No Reservations. SEATING EXTREMELY LIMITED.

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Originally written for television, Hilton Als’s Andy Warhol: The Series draws on historical accounts, rumors, and artwork to tell the story of the artist’s childhood, career, and fascination with Hollywood. The series is from the point of view of significant women in Warhol’s life–his mother and Shirley Temple. This evening will present the premiere reading, directed by New York-based director John Jesurun. Co-produced by Claire Montgomery and Alsun Keogh/Location One.

Hilton Als became a staff writer at The New Yorker in 1994 and a theatre critic in 2002. He began contributing to the magazine in 1989, writing pieces for The Talk of the Town. Before coming to The New Yorker, Als was a staff writer for the Village Voice and an editor-at-large at Vibe. His first book The Women was published in 1996. His most recent book White Girls, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the winner of the Lambda Literary Award in 2014, discusses various narratives of race and gender. In 1997, the New York Association of Black Journalists awarded Als first prize in both Magazine Critique/Review and Magazine Arts and Entertainment. He was awarded a Guggenheim for creative writing in 2000 and the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism for 2002-03. In 2016, he received Lambda Literary’s Trustee Award for Excellence in Literature. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 2017.

John Jesurun is a writer/director/media artist. Beginning with his 61 episode “Chang in a Void Moon” in 1982, his projects range from “Philoktetes”and “Faust” to “Delusion of the Fury” by Harry Partch and video for Jeff Buckley. Fellowships include Rockefeller, MacArthur, Guggenheim and Foundation for Contemporary Arts. His “Shatterhand Massacree and other Media Texts” is published by Performing Arts Journal. His webserial “Shadowland” can be seen on Vimeo.

Start: May 21, 2018
End: May 21, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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May 24

Puerto Rico: Theatre after Hurricane María

Photo by Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging

Thursday, May 24
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Panel

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Inspired by the tragic events and continued inaction in Puerto Rico, the Segal Center invites theatre and performance artists from Puerto Rico to speak about their artistic practices and how these have been impacted by Hurricane María. The evening will feature presentations, demonstrations, as well as an open forum to discuss the current state of performance and politics on the island. Invited artists and panelists include: Isel Rodríguez (Teatro Breve), Helen Ceballos (Mezcolanza), Kairiana Núñez (Mezcolanza), Mickey Negrón (Mezcolanza), and Libertad Guerra (Loisaida Center). The event will be moderated by Bertie Ferdman.

To see these artists performing, check out the 5th Annual 2018 Loisaida Festival:
Sunday, May 27 | 12:00pm – 5:00pm
La Plaza Cultural Community Graden
Loisaida Inc. and  Mezcolanza NYC present The Loisaida Festival’s Theater Lab, as part of the annual Loisaida Festival. Among the highlights of the program is the New York premiere of ¡Ay María!, a play that explores the post-Maria reality for an isolated group of neighbors in Puerto Rico that must come together after the storm.

 

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Helen Ceballos studied at the University of Puerto Rico and the National University of Art in Buenos Aires. She created Mezcolanza, a hybrid and multidisciplinary arts collaborative with artists from the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Helen directs the House of Culture Ruth Hernández Torres and chairs the board of the Casa de Mujer Dominicana in Puerto Rico.

 

 

 

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Libertad O. Guerra is the Acting Director and Chief Curator of the Loisaida Inc. Center. Her publications include essays in The Journal of Aesthetics and Protest and in the edited volume New York-Berlin: Kulturen in der Stadt. In 2015, she organized ¡Presente! The Young Lords in New York at Loisaida Inc. Cultural Center.

 

 

 

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Mickey Negrón trained at the University of Puerto Rico and has performed across the Americas, including collaborations with Rosa Luisa Márquez, Nao Bustamante, Guillermo Gomez Peña/La Pocha Nostra, Jóvenes del 98, Malayerba, and Yuyachkani. He is the Artistic Director of Asuntos Efímeros and curator of Quiebre: International Performance Festival in San Juan Puerto Rico.

 

 

 

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Isel Rodríguez is a member of the comedy collective, Teatro Breve, where she created Luna y Vecky—a hipster band that play hilariously irreverent-but-catchy songs, and Las monjas del cannabis, a pair of marijuana-dealing nuns. She has a Ph.D. in Theatre and Performance from ASU, an M.A. in Theatre Education from NYU, and teaches theatre in the Drama and English Departments at the University of Puerto Rico.

 

 

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Kairiana Núñez Santaliz has a BA from University of Puerto Rico (UPR) and has studied acting in Latin American and the Caribbean. Her work centers on themes of death, autobiography, colonialism, the situation in Puerto Rico, dogs, and dreams, among others. She always uses humor and poetry as active agents in her creative process.

 

 

 

Start: May 24, 2018
End: May 24, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
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June 26

Pride Voices: New Plays from Taiwan with Li-Ying Chien and Pao-Chang Tsai

Left: Li-Ying Chien’s The Possible Memoirs of a Traitor. Photo by Chin Jung Chun.
Right: Pao-Chang Tsai’s Solo Date. Photo courtesy of the artist

Tuesday, June 26
Segal Theatre

6:30pm Readings + Discussion

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Join us for an evening with two leading contemporary Taiwanese playwrights, Li-Ying Chien and Pao-Chang Tsai.

The evening will feature excerpted readings from The Possible Memoirs of a Traitor by Li-Ying Chien (directed by Knud Adams) and Solo Date by Pao-Chang Tsai (directed and performed by Tsai; dramaturgy by Soriya Chum). Followed by a panel discussion with the playwrights Li-Ying Chien and Pao-Chang Tsai, director Knud Adams, dramaturg Soriya Chum, James Wilson (Professor of Theatre, The Graduate Center), Yu-Yun Hsieh (Comparative Literature scholar, The Graduate Center), and Dennis Yueh-Yeh Li (Director). Moderated by Frank Hentschker.

The excerpt of The Possible Memoirs of a Traitor will be read by Alton Alburo, Jon Viktor Corpuz, Stephanie Ho, Abrielle Kuo, Kristine Haruna Lee, Jordan Rutter, and Nicholas Yenson.

Through their plays and stage works Chien and Tsai have reinvigorated the Taiwanese theatre-scape. Blending new media, real-life event, and various performative techniques, their highly political and engaged works give voice to an emerging cultural movement in Taiwan. As established queer artists, their creative processes and cultural productions also shed light on the struggles and achievements of the LGBTQ community in Taiwan and Asia today.

Based on a comprehensive field study of the LGBTQ movement, HIV/AIDS medical treatment, and family and religious issues in Taiwanese society, Li-Ying Chien’s The Possible Memoirs of a Traitor (2017) uncovers stories from a Taipei gay shelter in the 90’s. Pao-Chang Tsai’s Solo Date (2016) takes place in the 2030’s. Using traditional Taiwanese ritual and AI technology, a man reaches back in time in search of his deceased lover. But after decrypting the lover’s private data, new truths come to light.

Co-curated by Yu Chien Liu (Martin E. Segal Theatre Center) and Chi-Ping Yen (Taipei Cultural Center in New York), with support from Ministry of Culture, Taiwan and Taipei Cultural Center in New York.

 

 

Photo by Bien Dong

Li-Ying Chien is a Taiwanese playwright and director. Li-Ying received her BA degree in Theatre Arts from Chinese Culture University and majored in MFA Playwriting at Taipei National University of the Arts. Selected as one of the “Top 10 Promising Theatre Artists” by Performing Arts Review magazine in 2011, she was also named “Outstanding Theatre Artist” by the same magazine in 2012. Li-Ying was the Artist-in-Residence of The National Theater & Concert Hall in 2015.

 

 

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Pao-Chang Tsai graduated from the Department of Drama and Theatre at the National Taiwan University and received his master in music theatre from Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, University of London. He was the co-artistic director at Tainaner Ensemble from 2009 to 2018. The Common Wealth Magazine has selected Pao-Chang Tsai as the Future Young Leader in Performing arts. He also went to America Repertory Theater at Harvard University for further study in Voice and Speech sponsored by Asian Cultural Council, and visited Moscow Art Theatre for three months.

 

 

 

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Knud Adams is a director of new and experimental plays. His recent productions include Tin Cat Shoes (Trish Harnetiaux, Clubbed Thumb), Aloha, Aloha, or When I Was Queen (Eliza Bent, Abrons), The Workshop (Torrey Townsend, Soft Focus), Asshole (Justin Kuritzkes, JACK), On a Clear Day I Can See to Elba (Eliza Bent, The New Ohio), Every Angel is Brutal (Julia Jarcho, Clubbed Thumb), Tom & Eliza (Celine Song, JACK), That Poor Girl and How He Killed Her (Jen Silverman, U. of Rochester), Krazytown (Jenny Schwartz, NYU), and Snore (Max Posner, Juilliard). He is a Drama League Artist in Residence and a former Drama League Directing Fellow, Soho Rep Writer/Director Lab member, and Playwrights Horizons Directing Resident. www.knudadams.com

 

 

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Soriya K. Chum is a dramaturg and producer of talks, performances, and live events. He is currently the Manager of Humanities & Studio Programs at Theatre for a New Audience. Previously, Soriya has held roles at the Asian American Arts Alliance, the Martin E. Segal Center, Theatre Communications Group, and HERE Arts Center. MFA in Dramaturgy, Columbia University.

 

 

 

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James F. Wilson is Professor of English and Theatre at LaGuardia Community College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is a former executive director of CUNY’s Center for LGBT Studies (CLAGS), and his articles and reviews have appeared in numerous academic journals and chapter anthologies. He is co-editor of The Journal of American Drama and Theatre, published by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, and the author of Bulldaggers, Pansies, and Chocolate Babies: Performance, Race, and Sexuality in the Harlem Renaissance (University of Michigan Press, 2010; paperback 2011).

 

 

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Yu-Yun Hsieh is a Taiwanese writer and academic, currently a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and an adjunct lecturer in English at Hunter College. She is the recipient of the 2004 UNITAS Emerging Writers Award and the 2009 Taipei Literature Award. Her Chinese translation of Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49 was published in 2014.  She is also a former fiction fellow of the Writers’ Institute of CUNY. Her work has appeared in n+1Open Letters MonthlyWorld Literature TodayTimes Literary Supplement and The New York Times Book Review.

 

 

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Originally from Taiwan, Dennis Yueh-Yeh Li earned his MA in Performance Studies at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. He works as a director, playwright, and performer, having created productions addressed upon sexuality, philosophy, and politics, to give his unique perspectives on time, space, and power relations. Dennis is an Associate Artistic Director of the Living Theatre, is also a former fellowship recipient of the Institute of Target Margin Theater. His directing credits include L.ear (Dixon Place), Blind (Theater for the New City), The (New) Trial (Theater for the New City), and Civilization and Its Discontents (Judson Memorial Church). Currently, Dennis is the New York Directing Fellow of Drama League.

 

 

Start: Jun 26, 2018
End: Jun 26, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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September 27

Towards Arab Dramaturgies (Day 1)

Hunter Canning  World Premier of The Strangest. by Betty Shamieh, 2017, 4th Street Theater 

Thursday, September 27th   
2:00pm–9:00pm Conference Room #9206, 9th floor

Friday, September 28th   
9:00am–6:00pm Skylight Room #9100, 9th floor

Free + Open to the public
First come, first served
Please RSVP here: mestc@gc.cuny.edu

We would like to invite you to participate and attend the upcoming  Towards Arab Dramaturgies symposium in New York City at the Graduate Center, CUNY, New York.

The 2018 symposium Towards Arab Dramaturgies is part of the exchange partnership between the Martin E. Segal Theater Center, the Ph.D. Program in Theatre and Performance at The Graduate Center CUNY and the Theater Initiative at the American University of Beirut (AUB). The symposium is organized and curated by Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall, Frank Hentschker and Salma S. Zohdi, with additional support from Sahar Assaf and Robert Myers.

|About the Symposium|

With a focus in this symposium on Arabic dramaturgies, we hope to begin to answer these questions. As a term that bridges the ideas and practice of contemporary performance, dramaturgy draws our attention to the process of artistic production. It explores the notion that process is performance and invites us to look at the question of how artists connect ideas and forms in their work.

This symposium will feature research papers, artist talks and roundtable events. The sessions and papers will be compiled in a publication/book that will be generated from the discussions at the convening. The event will be live streamed and will be archived at the Segal Center’s Youtube page.

Contemporary theatre and performance in the Arabic world is a diverse and contested set of practices that are unfolding in a fast-changing political and culturally complex region. In this situation, the performing arts are under pressure to independently produce new work, uphold traditions— and simultaneously to speak about contemporary lives, nationalism, class, race, religion, gender and new forms of theatre. In this symposium, we ask how theatre can continue to grow, develop artistically and continue to be a voice in the future of the Arabic world. How can the theatre in the region thrive?

Scheduled speakers and panelists include: Khalid Amine, Eman Antar, Sahar Assaf, Dalia Basiouny, Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi,
Wafaa Bilal, Leila Buck, Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall,
Yussef El Guindi, Frank Hentschker, Rania Lee Khalil,
Amahl Khouri, Ashley Marinaccio, Robert Myers, Rashi Mishra, Rubén Polendo (Theatre Mitu), Heather Raffo, Betty Shamieh, and Sarah Youssef.

|Schedule|

Day 1, Thursday, Sept, 27
(Conference Room #9206, 9th floor)

 

2:00pm – 5:00pm      Paper Presentations / Q&A

  • Robert Myers: Using Theater History, Translation Studies and Performance Studies to Redefine Arab Dramaturgy
  • Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi: Resistance Creative Languages
  • Eman Antar: Dances of Resistance in the Middle East and North Africa
  • Rashi Mishra: Traversing through the Siege: Role of movement and memory in performing cultural resistance
  • Ashley Marinaccio: Youth Theatre in Palestine

5:00pm –  6:00pm            Break

6:00pm –  6:15pm            Welcome note by Chase Robinson
Welcome by Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall, Frank Hentschker, Sahar Assaf, and Robert Myers

6:30pm –  7:30pm            Keynote by Wafaa Bilal:
Participatory Art, Multiple Platforms / Q&A

 7:30pm –  7:40pm            A tribute to Hazem Azmi: Moment of Silence, Excerpt readings

7:40pm –  9:00pm            Drinks & Snacks in Green Room, Room 3111, 3rd Floor

For day 2 schedule, click here.

About the Participants:

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Khalid Amine is Senior Professor of Performance Studies at the Faculty of Letters and Humanities, Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Tetouan, Morocco. Among his published books: Beyond Brecht (1996), Moroccan Theatre Between East and West (2000), Fields of Silence in Moroccan Theatre (2004), Dramatic Art and the Myth of Origins: Fields of Silence (2007). Amine is Co-author with Distinguished Professor Marvin Carlson The Theatres of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia: Performance Traditions of the Maghreb (London & New York: Palgrave, 2012).

 

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Eman Mostafa Antar is a translator and master research scholar at the Department of English Language and Literature, Cairo University. Her main areas of research are visual, cultural and gender studies. In 2016, she participated in Dancing the Self, a contemporary dance workshop for women and in April 2017, she performed in a project entitled: (Un)Covered en Masse that was staged on Falaki theatre, Cairo, along with other 25 women. She is also a member of two creative writing &storytelling groups: Seshat and Ana Elhekaya. Now, she is a Fulbright foreign language teaching assistant (FLTA) of Arabic language in Northeastern University, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Boston, MA.

 

Photo by Rayan Ghannam

Sahar Assaf is an actress, stage director and Assistant Professor of Theatre at the American University of Beirut. She recently translated and directed Garcia-Lorca’s Blood Wedding as a site-specific performance and co-translated, co-directed and starred in Shakespeare’s King Lear. Sahar is a member of Lincoln Center Director’s Lab (2014), a member of Directors Lab North in Toronto (2017) and a Fulbright alumnus with an MA in Theatre Studies from Central Washington University (2011).

 

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Dalia Basiouny is an Egyptian writer, theatre maker, activist, academic and translator. Her theatre work includes directing 20 plays performed in Egypt, England, USA, Morocco, Iraq, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia and Germany. Basiouny’s theatre and academic work focuses on the role of women in theatre. Her Ph.D. from CUNY Graduate Center explores the political theatre of Arab American Women after 9/11. She established “Sabeel for the Arts” in Cairo,1997. This independent group promotes women’s work, explores non-traditional theatre settings, and new ways of telling women stories in theatre and on film. She is a recipient of many awards including the Fulbright Arts Grant, USA; the British Council Chevening Scholarship, UK; and the theatre award from the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture (AFAC) for her play “Solitaire”.

 

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Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi born in Algiers and operating from Brussels, is a curator, dramaturge and documentary filmmaker. She was involved as guest curator in ‘Casablanca-Energienoire’ within Mons 2015 -Cultural Capital of Europe, associate curator in the ‘Arab Art Focus’ at Downtown Contemporary Arts Festival (D-CAF, Cairo) in 2016, and for the next show case within the Arab Art Focus at Edinburgh Fringe Festival (2017) . She is actively involved in projects involving young Arab dancers: dramaturgy of performances, research and documenting, curatorship and publications. She is regularly contributing for her specific expertise for public debates and discussions, in Europe and the Mena region.

 

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Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal is renowned for provoking dialogue about international politics and internal dynamics through high profile, technologically-driven projects that employ the use of robotics, the internet, and photographic mobile mapping. Bilal’s work is constantly informed by the experience of fleeing his homeland and existing simultaneously in two worlds – his home in the “comfort zone” of the U.S. and his consciousness of the “conflict zone” in Iraq. Using his own body as a medium, Bilal continues to challenge our comfort zone with projects like 3rdi, and Counting, Domestic Tension and 168:01. He lives and works in New York City.

 

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Leila Buck is a Lebanese American playwright, actor, and intercultural facilitator who has lived, taught, performed and/or traveled in 11 Arab countries and around the world. She has performed her work and others at the Public Theater, New York Theatre Workshop, Cleveland Public Theatre, Mosaic theater at Arena Stage, and across the U.S.. A State Dept. Speaker Specialist and Cultural Envoy, she has performed, led master workshops and taught theatrical tools for literacy, conflict resolution, and intercultural communication to U.N. delegates, aid workers, youth, educators, and business and intercultural leaders across the U.S. and around the world. Her work is featured in American Theatre magazine, Innovation in Five Acts; Etching Our Own Image: Voices from the Arab American Art Movement, and Four Arab-American Plays. Public Theater’s inaugural Emerging Writers Group; Usual Suspect (NYTW); Adjunct Professor, The Middle East on Stage (NYU). www.leilabuck.com

 

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Marvin Carlson is the Sidney E. Cohn Distinguished Professor of Theatre, Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the Director of the Marvin Carlson Theatre Center at the Shanghai Theatre Academy, China. Carlson has a Ph.D. in drama and theatre from Cornell University. His wide-ranging research and teaching interests include dramatic theory and Western European theatre history, dramatic literature, and translation, especially of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. He has been awarded the ATHE Career Achievement Award, the George Jean Nathan Prize, the Bernard Hewitt prize, the George Freedley Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has been a Walker-Ames Professor at the University of Washington, a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies at Indiana University, a visiting professor at the Freie Universitat of Berlin, and a Fellow of the American Theatre. In 2005 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Athens. His best-known book, Theories of the Theatre (1993), has been translated into eight languages. His 2001 book, The Haunted Stage, won the Calloway Prize.

 

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Peter Eckersall is the EO of Theatre & Performance Program, The Graduate Center, CUNY. A pioneering researcher in Japanese theatre and dramaturgy and contemporary performance, his recent publications include We’re People Who Do Shows: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility (coedited with Helena Grehan, Performance Research Books, 2013); Theatre and Performance in the Asia-Pacific: Regional Modernities in the Global Era (coauthored with Denise Varney, Barbara Hatley, and Chris Hudson, Palgrave, 2013); and Performativity and Event in 1960s Japan: City, Body, Memory (Palgrave, 2013). His current project New media dramaturgy: How new media transform the composition and reception of live performance is funded by the Australian Research Council. He is a visiting fellow in the Centre for Interweaving Performance Cultures, Berlin; resident dramaturg for Not Yet It’s Difficult, a contemporary performance group based in Melbourne; and coconvenor of the Dramaturgy and Performance Studies Working Group at Performance Studies International (PSi), and was cofounder of Dramaturgies.

 

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Yussef El Guindi’s recent productions include The Talented Ones at Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland (Santa Barbara Independent Indy Award); Our Enemies: Lively Scenes of Love and Combat at Golden Thread Productions (American Theatre Critics Association’s M. Elizabeth Osborn Award); and Threesome at Portland Center Stage, ACT, and at 59E59 (Portland Drammy for Best Original Script).

 

 

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Frank Hentschker (Executive Director, The Segal Center) who holds a Ph.D. in theatre from the now legendary Institute for Applied Theatre Studies in Giessen, Germany, came to the Graduate Center in 2001 as program director for the Graduate Center’s Martin E. Segal Theatre Center and was appointed to the central doctoral faculty in theatre in 2009. Among the vital events and series he founded at the Segal Center are the World Theatre Performance series, the annual fall PRELUDE Festival, and the PEN World Voices Playwrights Series. Before coming to The Graduate Center, Hentschker founded and directed DISCURS, the largest European student theater festival existing today; he acted as Hamlet in Heiner Müller’s Hamletmaschine, directed by Heiner Müller; created a performance with Joseph Beuys; performed in the Robert Wilson play The Forest (music by David Byrne) and worked for Robert Wilson. Next to programming Segal Theatre Center events Frank taught Theatre History at Columbia University and is currently working on a book about Robert Wilson’s play texts.

 

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Rania Lee Khalil’s works in performance and moving image reflect on the beauty and fragility of wildlife and human (culture)s. Her performances have been seen at Judson Church, Utopia Station, Ontological-Hysteric Theater in New York; Aomori Art Museum Japan, Al Ma’mal Contemporary Art Jerusalem, Kiasma Museum, Helsinki, Zawya Cinema, Cairo and the artistic research pavilion of the 2015 Venice Biennale. She is presently completing a doctorate in artistic research at Theatre Academy Helsinki.

 

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Amahl Khouri a queer and trans mixed race Jordanian documentary playwright and theatre maker based in Munich. Khouri is the author of several plays, including She He Me (Vienna 2019) and No Matter Where I Go (Beirut 2014). Khouri was a selected playwright at the Arcola Global Queer Plays and the Lark hotINK international play reading series. Khouri is also the recipient of a Rosenthal Emerging Voices fellowship from PEN USA and was member of the Lincoln Center Director’s Lab in 2013. Khouri’s work has been published in several U.S. journals and in the International Perspectives on Where Performance Leads Queer anthology.

 

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Ashley Marinaccio is a theatre artist and scholar who creates work to challenge the status quo. She is dedicated to documenting the socio-political issues that define our times. As a director and playwright, her work has been seen offBroadway, at the White House, United Nations, TED conferences across the United States, Europe and Asia. Currently, Ash is working on her Ph.D. in the Department of Theatre and Performance at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is focusing on theatre and war. Ash is the founding Artistic Director of the theatre company and United Nations NGO Girl Be Heard, where she received numerous accolades, including LPTW’s Lucille Lortel Women’s Visionary Award. She is a co-founder/director of Co-Op Theatre East and member of the Civilians Field Research Team. Ash is on the faculty at Pace University and Hunter College.

 

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Robert Myers (www.robert-myers.com) is a professor of English at AUB, director of the Alwaleed Center for American Studies and co-director of AUB’s Theater Initiative. He is the author of over fifteen plays, which have been produced all over the U.S., he has produced and worked as a dramaturg with Sahar Assaf on half a dozen plays in Lebanon and translated six plays from Arabic to English with Nada Saab. He is co-editor and co-translator with Nada Saab of Contemporary Political Theater from the Levant, forthcoming this year from Brill, and Sentence to Hope, a Sa’dallah Wannous reader, forthcoming from Yale University Press in 2019.

 

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Rashi Mishra is a theatre practitioner and researcher from India, working at the intersection of theatre and politics. Rashi received an MA in Performance Studies from Tisch School of Arts, New York University and is a recipient of Gallatin Global Fellowship in Human Rights from NYU, as part of which Rashi have worked with The Freedom Theatre (Palestine) researching and writing about the role of theatre within the Human Rights discourse.

 

 

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Rubén Polendo (Founding Artistic Director, Theater Mitu) is a director, writer, and creative technologist whose practice and pedagogical work is situated in the tension between acting and performance, theatrical design and installation, and multimedia and interactive technology. His work with Theater Mitu has been presented and developed nationally and internationally. Polendo recently served as Founding Theater Program Director and Associate Dean for the Arts Center, both at NYU Abu Dhabi. Polendo is currently Chair of Undergraduate Drama at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Founded in 1997, Theater Mitu is a permanent group of collaborators committed to expanding the definition of theater through methodical experimentation with its form. The company investigates global performances as a source of their training, work, and methodologies.

 

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Heather Raffo is an award-winning playwright and actress who’s work has taken her from the Kennedy Center to the US Islamic World Forum and from the Aspen Ideas Institute into hundreds of classrooms across our nation. She has been seen off Broadway, off West End in regional theater and in film. She is the author of 9 PARTS OF DESIRE (Lucielle Lortel award, Blackburn, Drama League, OCC, Helen Hayes nominations), which The New Yorker called “an example of how art can remake the world”; the librettist to the opera FALLUJAH (NYC Opera, Long Beach Opera); and her newest play, NOURA, (Weissberger Award) premieres at Playwrights Horizons in Nov/Dec this year.

 

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Betty Shamieh is a Palestinian-American playwright and author of fifteen plays. Her productions include The Black Eyed (New York Theatre Workshop), Fit for a Queen (Classical Theatre of Harlem), and Roar (The New Group). Roar was the first play by a Palestinian-American playwright produced off-Broadway. A graduate of Harvard College and the Yale School of Drama, she was named a UNESCO Young Artist for Intercultural Dialogue and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her works have been translated into seven languages. www.bettyshamieh.com.

 

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Sarah Youssef is an Egyptian-German internationally working freelance theatre maker and research scholar. She has completed her undergraduate studies in Theatre at the American University in Cairo, Egypt and her graduate degrees in Text and Performance Studies at RADA/King’s College London and in Cross Sectoral and Community Arts at Goldsmiths University. Since fall 2012, Sarah is editorial assistant of gender forum – An Internet Journal for Gender Studies and research assistant at the University of Cologne, Germany where she also teaches. Sarah has been a CUNY visiting research scholar in 2014 and 2017. She holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Cologne, Germany, where she completed her dissertation on her decade-long empirical research on UK and US prison theatre (forthcoming 2019, Intellect Publishing). She is currently working on her research as well as her practice on immersive theatre productions and the reimagining of classic texts in theatre and performance.

 

Photo by Annabel Guevara

Salma S. Zohdi is an Egyptian Dramaturg based in New York City, and was the 2017/2018 Next Generation Fellow at The Martin E. Segal Theatre Center. In Egypt, she worked as a producer, teaching artist, stage manager, playwright, translator, and assistant director. NYC credits: Nathan the Wise at CSC, The Mecca Tales, “Arab Classic Plays” and “Re-reading Oppression” at the Segal Center, and American Dreams & Arabian Nights at the BRICLab. Salma is also a collaborator on a work-in-development of a theatre adaptation of Dr Alaa El Aswany’s acclaimed Egyptian novel The Yacoubian Building. MA: AUC – English & Comparative Literature. MFA: Columbia University – Theatre (Dramaturgy).

 

Date: September 27
Venue: Room 9206
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September 28

Towards Arab Dramaturgies (Day 2)

Photo: Hunter Canning  World Premier of The Strangest. by Betty Shamieh, 2017, 4th Street Theater

Thursday, September 27th   
2:00pm–9:00pm Conference Room #9206, 9th floor

Friday, September 28th   
9:00am–6:00pm Skylight Room #9100, 9th floor

Free + Open to the public
First come, first served
Please RSVP here: mestc@gc.cuny.edu

We would like to invite you to participate and attend the upcoming  Towards Arab Dramaturgies symposium in New York City at the Graduate Center, CUNY, New York.

The 2018 symposium Towards Arab Dramaturgies is part of the exchange partnership between the Martin E. Segal Theater Center, the Ph.D. Program in Theatre and Performance at The Graduate Center CUNY and the Theater Initiative at the American University of Beirut (AUB). The symposium is organized and curated by Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall, Frank Hentschker and Salma S. Zohdi, with additional support from Sahar Assaf and Robert Myers.

 |About the Symposium|

With a focus in this symposium on Arabic dramaturgies, we hope to begin to answer these questions. As a term that bridges the ideas and practice of contemporary performance, dramaturgy draws our attention to the process of artistic production. It explores the notion that process is performance and invites us to look at the question of how artists connect ideas and forms in their work.

This symposium will feature research papers, artist talks and roundtable events. The sessions and papers will be compiled in a publication/book that will be generated from the discussions at the convening. The event will be live streamed and will be archived at the Segal Center’s Youtube page.

Contemporary theatre and performance in the Arabic world is a diverse and contested set of practices that are unfolding in a fast-changing political and culturally complex region. In this situation, the performing arts are under pressure to independently produce new work, uphold traditions— and simultaneously to speak about contemporary lives, nationalism, class, race, religion, gender and new forms of theatre. In this symposium, we ask how theatre can continue to grow, develop artistically and continue to be a voice in the future of the Arabic world. How can the theatre in the region thrive?

Scheduled speakers and panelists include: Khalid Amine, Eman Antar, Sahar Assaf, Dalia Basiouny, Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi,
Wafaa Bilal, Leila Buck, Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall,
Yussef El Guindi, Frank Hentschker, Rania Lee Khalil,
Amahl Khouri, Ashley Marinaccio, Robert Myers, Rashi Mishra, Rubén Polendo (Theatre Mitu), Heather Raffo, Betty Shamieh, and Sarah Youssef.

|Schedule|

Day 2, Friday, Sept, 28
(Skylight Room #9100, 9th floor)

9:00am – 9:50am             Registration/Coffee

10:00am –  11:30am        Arab Stages Advisory Board Session
Opening Remarks: Arab Dramaturgies: A Mutiplicity of Options
by Marvin Carlson
Introduction by Betty Shamieh
Conversation with Marvin Carlson and others / Q&A

11:30pm –  1:00pm         Theatre of the Real: Dramaturgy in the Arab Context
with Amahl Khouri, Theatre Mitu, Sahar Assaf, and Peter Eckersall / Q&A

1:00pm –  2:30pm            Lunch Break

 * 2:30pm –  4:00pm        Paper Presentations

  • Opening by Marvin Carlson: Arab Dramaturgy in Medieval Cairo: The Ibn Dāniyāl Trilogy
  • Khalid Amine: Alternative Arab Dramaturgies
  • Sarah Youssef: Arab Dramaturgies on the European Stage: Liwaa Yazji’s Goats (Royal Court, 2017), Mohammad Al-Attar’s The Factory (Ruhrtriennale, 2018)
  • Dalia Basiouny: Dramaturgies of the Revolution

* 4:00pm –  5:30pm        Arab American and Arab Artists in conversation
Opening by Yussef El Guindi
Conversation with Sahar Assaf, Dalia Basiouny, Leila Buck, Rania Khalil, Amahl Khoury, Heather Raffo, and Betty Shamieh.
Moderated by Frank Hentschker / Q&A

* 5:30pm –  6:00pm        Wrap up, Recap, and Conclusions by Marvin Carlson, Peter Eckersall, Frank Hentschker, Sahar Assaf, and Robert Myers

* Coffee and snacks in Green Room, Room 3111, 3rd Floor

For day 1 schedule, click here

 

 

About the Participants:

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Khalid Amine is Senior Professor of Performance Studies at the Faculty of Letters and Humanities, Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Tetouan, Morocco. Among his published books: Beyond Brecht (1996), Moroccan Theatre Between East and West (2000), Fields of Silence in Moroccan Theatre (2004), Dramatic Art and the Myth of Origins: Fields of Silence (2007). Amine is Co-author with Distinguished Professor Marvin Carlson The Theatres of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia: Performance Traditions of the Maghreb (London & New York: Palgrave, 2012).

 

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Eman Mostafa Antar is a translator and master research scholar at the Department of English Language and Literature, Cairo University. Her main areas of research are visual, cultural and gender studies. In 2016, she participated in Dancing the Self, a contemporary dance workshop for women and in April 2017, she performed in a project entitled: (Un)Covered en Masse that was staged on Falaki theatre, Cairo, along with other 25 women. She is also a member of two creative writing &storytelling groups: Seshat and Ana Elhekaya. Now, she is a Fulbright foreign language teaching assistant (FLTA) of Arabic language in Northeastern University, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Boston, MA.

 

Photo by Rayan Ghannam

Sahar Assaf is an actress, stage director and Assistant Professor of Theatre at the American University of Beirut. She recently translated and directed Garcia-Lorca’s Blood Wedding as a site-specific performance and co-translated, co-directed and starred in Shakespeare’s King Lear. Sahar is a member of Lincoln Center Director’s Lab (2014), a member of Directors Lab North in Toronto (2017) and a Fulbright alumnus with an MA in Theatre Studies from Central Washington University (2011).

 

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Dalia Basiouny is an Egyptian writer, theatre maker, activist, academic and translator. Her theatre work includes directing 20 plays performed in Egypt, England, USA, Morocco, Iraq, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia and Germany. Basiouny’s theatre and academic work focuses on the role of women in theatre. Her Ph.D. from CUNY Graduate Center explores the political theatre of Arab American Women after 9/11. She established “Sabeel for the Arts” in Cairo,1997. This independent group promotes women’s work, explores non-traditional theatre settings, and new ways of telling women stories in theatre and on film. She is a recipient of many awards including the Fulbright Arts Grant, USA; the British Council Chevening Scholarship, UK; and the theatre award from the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture (AFAC) for her play “Solitaire”.

 

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Nedjma Hadj Benchelabi born in Algiers and operating from Brussels, is a curator, dramaturge and documentary filmmaker. She was involved as guest curator in ‘Casablanca-Energienoire’ within Mons 2015 -Cultural Capital of Europe, associate curator in the ‘Arab Art Focus’ at Downtown Contemporary Arts Festival (D-CAF, Cairo) in 2016, and for the next show case within the Arab Art Focus at Edinburgh Fringe Festival (2017) . She is actively involved in projects involving young Arab dancers: dramaturgy of performances, research and documenting, curatorship and publications. She is regularly contributing for her specific expertise for public debates and discussions, in Europe and the Mena region.

 

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Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal is renowned for provoking dialogue about international politics and internal dynamics through high profile, technologically-driven projects that employ the use of robotics, the internet, and photographic mobile mapping. Bilal’s work is constantly informed by the experience of fleeing his homeland and existing simultaneously in two worlds – his home in the “comfort zone” of the U.S. and his consciousness of the “conflict zone” in Iraq. Using his own body as a medium, Bilal continues to challenge our comfort zone with projects like 3rdi, and Counting, Domestic Tension and 168:01. He lives and works in New York City.

 

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Leila Buck is a Lebanese American playwright, actor, and intercultural facilitator who has lived, taught, performed and/or traveled in 11 Arab countries and around the world. She has performed her work and others at the Public Theater, New York Theatre Workshop, Cleveland Public Theatre, Mosaic theater at Arena Stage, and across the U.S.. A State Dept. Speaker Specialist and Cultural Envoy, she has performed, led master workshops and taught theatrical tools for literacy, conflict resolution, and intercultural communication to U.N. delegates, aid workers, youth, educators, and business and intercultural leaders across the U.S. and around the world. Her work is featured in American Theatre magazine, Innovation in Five Acts; Etching Our Own Image: Voices from the Arab American Art Movement, and Four Arab-American Plays. Public Theater’s inaugural Emerging Writers Group; Usual Suspect (NYTW); Adjunct Professor, The Middle East on Stage (NYU). www.leilabuck.com

 

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Marvin Carlson is the Sidney E. Cohn Distinguished Professor of Theatre, Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the Director of the Marvin Carlson Theatre Center at the Shanghai Theatre Academy, China. Carlson has a Ph.D. in drama and theatre from Cornell University. His wide-ranging research and teaching interests include dramatic theory and Western European theatre history, dramatic literature, and translation, especially of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. He has been awarded the ATHE Career Achievement Award, the George Jean Nathan Prize, the Bernard Hewitt prize, the George Freedley Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has been a Walker-Ames Professor at the University of Washington, a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies at Indiana University, a visiting professor at the Freie Universitat of Berlin, and a Fellow of the American Theatre. In 2005 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Athens. His best-known book, Theories of the Theatre (1993), has been translated into eight languages. His 2001 book, The Haunted Stage, won the Calloway Prize.

 

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Peter Eckersall is the EO of Theatre & Performance Program, The Graduate Center, CUNY. A pioneering researcher in Japanese theatre and dramaturgy and contemporary performance, his recent publications include We’re People Who Do Shows: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility (coedited with Helena Grehan, Performance Research Books, 2013); Theatre and Performance in the Asia-Pacific: Regional Modernities in the Global Era (coauthored with Denise Varney, Barbara Hatley, and Chris Hudson, Palgrave, 2013); and Performativity and Event in 1960s Japan: City, Body, Memory (Palgrave, 2013). His current project New media dramaturgy: How new media transform the composition and reception of live performance is funded by the Australian Research Council. He is a visiting fellow in the Centre for Interweaving Performance Cultures, Berlin; resident dramaturg for Not Yet It’s Difficult, a contemporary performance group based in Melbourne; and coconvenor of the Dramaturgy and Performance Studies Working Group at Performance Studies International (PSi), and was cofounder of Dramaturgies.

 

Photo by Ann-Margaret Johnson

Yussef El Guindi’s recent productions include The Talented Ones at Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland (Santa Barbara Independent Indy Award); Our Enemies: Lively Scenes of Love and Combat at Golden Thread Productions (American Theatre Critics Association’s M. Elizabeth Osborn Award); and Threesome at Portland Center Stage, ACT, and at 59E59 (Portland Drammy for Best Original Script).

 

 

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Frank Hentschker (Executive Director, The Segal Center) who holds a Ph.D. in theatre from the now legendary Institute for Applied Theatre Studies in Giessen, Germany, came to the Graduate Center in 2001 as program director for the Graduate Center’s Martin E. Segal Theatre Center and was appointed to the central doctoral faculty in theatre in 2009. Among the vital events and series he founded at the Segal Center are the World Theatre Performance series, the annual fall PRELUDE Festival, and the PEN World Voices Playwrights Series. Before coming to The Graduate Center, Hentschker founded and directed DISCURS, the largest European student theater festival existing today; he acted as Hamlet in Heiner Müller’s Hamletmaschine, directed by Heiner Müller; created a performance with Joseph Beuys; performed in the Robert Wilson play The Forest (music by David Byrne) and worked for Robert Wilson. Next to programming Segal Theatre Center events Frank taught Theatre History at Columbia University and is currently working on a book about Robert Wilson’s play texts.

 

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Rania Lee Khalil’s works in performance and moving image reflect on the beauty and fragility of wildlife and human (culture)s. Her performances have been seen at Judson Church, Utopia Station, Ontological-Hysteric Theater in New York; Aomori Art Museum Japan, Al Ma’mal Contemporary Art Jerusalem, Kiasma Museum, Helsinki, Zawya Cinema, Cairo and the artistic research pavilion of the 2015 Venice Biennale. She is presently completing a doctorate in artistic research at Theatre Academy Helsinki.

 

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Amahl Khouri a queer and trans mixed race Jordanian documentary playwright and theatre maker based in Munich. Khouri is the author of several plays, including She He Me (Vienna 2019) and No Matter Where I Go (Beirut 2014). Khouri was a selected playwright at the Arcola Global Queer Plays and the Lark hotINK international play reading series. Khouri is also the recipient of a Rosenthal Emerging Voices fellowship from PEN USA and was member of the Lincoln Center Director’s Lab in 2013. Khouri’s work has been published in several U.S. journals and in the International Perspectives on Where Performance Leads Queer anthology.

 

Photo by Jodie Christopherson

Ashley Marinaccio is a theatre artist and scholar who creates work to challenge the status quo. She is dedicated to documenting the socio-political issues that define our times. As a director and playwright, her work has been seen offBroadway, at the White House, United Nations, TED conferences across the United States, Europe and Asia. Currently, Ash is working on her Ph.D. in the Department of Theatre and Performance at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is focusing on theatre and war. Ash is the founding Artistic Director of the theatre company and United Nations NGO Girl Be Heard, where she received numerous accolades, including LPTW’s Lucille Lortel Women’s Visionary Award. She is a co-founder/director of Co-Op Theatre East and member of the Civilians Field Research Team. Ash is on the faculty at Pace University and Hunter College.

 

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Robert Myers (www.robert-myers.com) is a professor of English at AUB, director of the Alwaleed Center for American Studies and co-director of AUB’s Theater Initiative. He is the author of over fifteen plays, which have been produced all over the U.S., he has produced and worked as a dramaturg with Sahar Assaf on half a dozen plays in Lebanon and translated six plays from Arabic to English with Nada Saab. He is co-editor and co-translator with Nada Saab of Contemporary Political Theater from the Levant, forthcoming this year from Brill, and Sentence to Hope, a Sa’dallah Wannous reader, forthcoming from Yale University Press in 2019.

 

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Rashi Mishra is a theatre practitioner and researcher from India, working at the intersection of theatre and politics. Rashi received an MA in Performance Studies from Tisch School of Arts, New York University and is a recipient of Gallatin Global Fellowship in Human Rights from NYU, as part of which Rashi have worked with The Freedom Theatre (Palestine) researching and writing about the role of theatre within the Human Rights discourse.

 

 

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Rubén Polendo (Founding Artistic Director, Theater Mitu) is a director, writer, and creative technologist whose practice and pedagogical work is situated in the tension between acting and performance, theatrical design and installation, and multimedia and interactive technology. His work with Theater Mitu has been presented and developed nationally and internationally. Polendo recently served as Founding Theater Program Director and Associate Dean for the Arts Center, both at NYU Abu Dhabi. Polendo is currently Chair of Undergraduate Drama at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Founded in 1997, Theater Mitu is a permanent group of collaborators committed to expanding the definition of theater through methodical experimentation with its form. The company investigates global performances as a source of their training, work, and methodologies.

 

Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post

Heather Raffo is an award-winning playwright and actress who’s work has taken her from the Kennedy Center to the US Islamic World Forum and from the Aspen Ideas Institute into hundreds of classrooms across our nation. She has been seen off Broadway, off West End in regional theater and in film. She is the author of 9 PARTS OF DESIRE (Lucielle Lortel award, Blackburn, Drama League, OCC, Helen Hayes nominations), which The New Yorker called “an example of how art can remake the world”; the librettist to the opera FALLUJAH (NYC Opera, Long Beach Opera); and her newest play, NOURA, (Weissberger Award) premieres at Playwrights Horizons in Nov/Dec this year.

 

Photo by Lisa Keating

Betty Shamieh is a Palestinian-American playwright and author of fifteen plays. Her productions include The Black Eyed (New York Theatre Workshop), Fit for a Queen (Classical Theatre of Harlem), and Roar (The New Group). Roar was the first play by a Palestinian-American playwright produced off-Broadway. A graduate of Harvard College and the Yale School of Drama, she was named a UNESCO Young Artist for Intercultural Dialogue and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her works have been translated into seven languages. www.bettyshamieh.com.

 

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Sarah Youssef is an Egyptian-German internationally working freelance theatre maker and research scholar. She has completed her undergraduate studies in Theatre at the American University in Cairo, Egypt and her graduate degrees in Text and Performance Studies at RADA/King’s College London and in Cross Sectoral and Community Arts at Goldsmiths University. Since fall 2012, Sarah is editorial assistant of gender forum – An Internet Journal for Gender Studies and research assistant at the University of Cologne, Germany where she also teaches. Sarah has been a CUNY visiting research scholar in 2014 and 2017. She holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Cologne, Germany, where she completed her dissertation on her decade-long empirical research on UK and US prison theatre (forthcoming 2019, Intellect Publishing). She is currently working on her research as well as her practice on immersive theatre productions and the reimagining of classic texts in theatre and performance.

 

Photo by Annabel Guevara

Salma S. Zohdi is an Egyptian Dramaturg based in New York City, and was the 2017/2018 Next Generation Fellow at The Martin E. Segal Theatre Center. In Egypt, she worked as a producer, teaching artist, stage manager, playwright, translator, and assistant director. NYC credits: Nathan the Wise at CSC, The Mecca Tales, “Arab Classic Plays” and “Re-reading Oppression” at the Segal Center, and American Dreams & Arabian Nights at the BRICLab. Salma is also a collaborator on a work-in-development of a theatre adaptation of Dr Alaa El Aswany’s acclaimed Egyptian novel The Yacoubian Building. MA: AUC – English & Comparative Literature. MFA: Columbia University – Theatre (Dramaturgy).

 

Date: September 28
Venue: SKYLIGHT ROOM
Category:
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October 4

Watch PRELUDE on YouTube

Date: October 4

October 5

Catch up on Spring 2018

Date: October 5

October 22

Vegard Vinge (Norway) + Ida Müller (Germany)

Photo courtesy of the artists.

Monday, October 22
Segal Theatre
10:00am Screenings + 6:30pm Artist Talk

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

The Segal Center is honored to welcome the notorious Norwegian/German theatre duo Vegard Vinge and Ida Müller in their first visit to the U.S. Throughout the last decade, Vinge and Müller have managed to scandalize European audiences through gothic somberness and seemingly naïve aesthetics. They often indulge in transgressive improvisation, body fluids, violence, masks, and excessive make-up to create a new and ironically monstrous Total-Work-of-Art.

Their shocking, delightful, and thoughtful defiling of the Ibsen corpus provided fresh perspectives and commentary on these classic texts, while creating an outrageously original theatre language. Their maximalist and extremist aesthetics have earned them multiple awards and invitations to Europe’s most prestigious stages, including their former artistic home, The Volksbühne Berlin. Throughout the day, Vinge and Müller will personally introduce premiere screenings of excerpts from all their work, including a new, widely anticipated film project.

All day screenings will include excerpts from Art Performance Videos, 2004-2005; A Doll’s House, Grusomhetens Tehatre Oslo, 2006; Ghosts, Ibsen, Black Box Teatre, Oslo, 2007; The Wildduck, Ibsen, The Bergen International Festival, 2009; John Gabriel Borkman, Ibsen, Volksbühne Berlin, 2012; Nationaltheater Reinickendorf, Berliner Festspiele, 2017; Untitled (in process), 2013-2015. Evening event will feature an introduction, entitled Fiction/Fetish, by Andrew Friedman.

 

Screening Schedule:

10:00am
A Doll’s House/ Ibsen
Grusomhetens Teater, Oslo | 2006 | 90 mins

11:30am
Ghosts / Ibsen
Black Box Teatre, Oslo | 2007 | 90 mins

1:00pm
The Wild Duck / Ibsen
Festspillene i Bergen, Bergen | 2010 | 60 mins

2:00pm
John Gabriel Borkman / Ibsen
Volksbühne, Berlin | 2012 | 90 mins

3:30pm
Nationaltheater Reinickendorf + Masterbuilder Solness / Ibsen
Berliner Festspiele, Berline | 2012 | 150 mins

 

 

Andrew Friedman is an assistant professor of theatre history at Ball State University and received his PhD in Theatre from the CUNY Graduate Center.  His articles on contemporary performance appear in Theatre Journal, Theater, Modernism/modernity, European Stages, Ibsen News and Comment, and the forthcoming collection, Postdramatic Theatre and Form. He is currently completing a manuscript about Vegard Vinge and Ida Müller’s Ibsen-Saga.

Date: October 22
Venue: Segal Theatre
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October 24

Orhan Pamuk’s Snow: Staged Reading with Orhan Pamuk (Turkey)

Orhan Pamuk’s Snow. Photo © Jean Louis Fernandez

Wednesday, October 24
Elebash Recital Hall
6:30pm Reading + Discussion

SEATING EXTREMELY LIMITED
PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY
FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Nobel Prize laureate in Literature Orhan Pamuk called Snow “my first and last political novel.” Set in the small city of Kars in northeastern Turkey, it tells a story of violence and tension between political Islamists, soldiers, secularists, and Kurdish and Turkish nationalists. An international sensation, the novel has been adapted for the stage in France by Blandine Savetier and Waddah Saab. After the American Premiere staged reading, translated by Taylor Gaines, Pamuk joins in conversation with Frank Hentschker, Executive Director of the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center.

Orhan Pamuk, born 1952, is a Turkish novelist, screenwriter, and academic. One of Turkey’s most prominent novelists, his work has sold over thirteen million books in sixty-three languages, making him the country’s best-selling writer. Pamuk is the author of Silent House, The White Castle, The Black Book, The New Life, and The Museum of Innocence, among others. He is also the Robert Yik-Fong Tam Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, where he teaches writing and comparative literature. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2018.

After a master in performing arts in Paris and drawing studies, Blandine Savetier trained as an actress with Stanislas Nordey in France and Anatoli Vassiliev in Moscow and Paris. She joined Conservatoire National Supérieur des Arts Dramatiques in Paris in 2003-2004, where she was trained in theatre direction with André Engel, Bob Wilson, and Krystian Lupa. She has mostly directed contemporary works, by authors including Thomas Bernhard, Samuel Beckett, Fernando Pessoa, Jean Genet, and Orhan Pamuk. Her work has been shown in renowned theatres in France and Belgium, including Théâtre du Rond-Point and Théâtre National de la Colline in Paris, Théâtre National de Strasbourg, Théâtre National in Brussels. They have received enthusiastic reviews in national newspapers. Her production of The President by Thomas Bernhard won the critics’ choice award.Her theatrical adaptation of Orhan Pamuk’s novel Snow, after her 2017 production in the Théâtre National de Strasbourg and a tour in France, has drawn international attention and praise, with TV reports by ARTE, TV5 Monde, BBC and just had a tour of a month and a half in national theaters in China and in international festivals. In recognition of these achievements, the director of Théâtre National de Strasbourg, Stanislas Nordey, has appointed her as an associated director. Besides being a theatre director, Blandine Savetier has been teaching acting for more than 10 years, in some of the most renowned theatre schools in France.

Waddah Saab is a French-Lebanese writer and dramaturg, born and raised in Senegal. After completing his studies in Paris, he worked in the European civil service. Passionate about literature and theatre, he has worked on Blandine Savetier’s productions as a dramaturg since 2002, making writing and theatre his primary career in 2013. His first novel, Si je t’oublie Tambacounda, is in the process of publication. He now lives in Brussels.

Taylor Gaines is a translator and freelance copyeditor based in New York. After a BA in Drama and French from the University of Virginia, and an MA in Cultural Translation from the American University of Paris, Taylor was a literary intern at Studio Theatre in Washington, D.C., and a literary fellow at The Play Company. She recently participated in the Rencontres de Traduction workshop as part of the Dramaturgies en dialogue festival, hosted by the Centre des auteurs dramatiques in Montreal.

Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, Cultural Services of the French Embassy, New York, and CUNY Graduate Center Public Programs, with additional support by FACE Contemporary Theater. Co-produced by Taylor Gaines in collaboration with the Segal Center.

Supported by FACE Contemporary Theater, a program developed by FACE Foundation and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States with the support from the Florence Gould Foundation, Institut français -Paris, the French Ministry of Culture and private donors. Additional support for women artists has been provided by Fondation CHANEL.

     

 

Start: Oct 24, 2018
End: Oct 24, 2018
Venue: Elebash Recital Hall
Category:
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October 29

Black Acting Methods with Sharrell D. Luckett

Cover of Black Acting Methods Critical Approaches.

Monday, October 29
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Discussion + Afternoon  Interactive Seminar

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Celebrating the recent publication of Black Acting Methods: Critical Approaches (Routledge 2017),
Dr. Sharrell D. Luckett will host a conversation with fellow theatre teachers, researchers, and makers, Kashi Johnson and Jonathan Mathias Lassiter, concerning the decolonization of acting methods and pedagogies. While recent conversations tend to focus on norms of representation, this event seeks to explore the myriad eurocentric assumptions that are at play in the formative process of acting, and to present alternatives that stem from African legacies, sensibilities, and experiences. In addition to the public conversation, a closed session for interested actors will take place during the afternoon. registration to the session is now closed.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Sharrell D. Luckett, Ph.D. is Director of the Weinberger Center for Drama and Playwriting and Assistant Professor of Drama and Performance Studies at the University of Cincinnati. She is lead editor of the award-winning Black Acting Methods: Critical Approaches (2017), and author of YoungGiftedandFat: An Autoethnography of Size, Sexuality, & Privilege (2018). In addition to working as a dramaturg, playwright, and actress, Luckett has directed Topdog/Underdog by Suzan-Lori Parks, for colored girls… by Ntozake Shange, Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, Ruined by Lynn Nottage, and Dreamgirls by Krieger & Eyan, among others. She is founding Director of the Black Acting Methods® Studio, a training program in performance theory and practice.

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Kashi Johnson is Professor of Theatre at Lehigh University where she teaches acting courses and Hip Hop theatre. In addition to being a director and actress, Johnson is a pioneer and innovator in Hip Hop Theatre pedagogy. She has given talks about her cutting-edge Hip Hop Theatre course ‘Act Like You Know,’ for TEDx and BlackademicsTV. She has also published on the topic in Black Acting Methods: Critical Approaches, and authored a chapter on her pedagogy in the forthcoming Routledge Companion to African American Theatre and Performance.

 

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Jonathan Mathias Lassiter, Ph.D. is a polymath who utilizes psychology, writing, and dance to help others heal and thrive. His roles include licensed clinical health psychologist, professor, author, movement scientist, and highly sought-after public speaker. Dr. Lassiter is the award-winning co-editor (with Dr. Lourdes D. Follins) of Black LGBT Health in the United States: The Intersection of Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation. This book received the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association’s Achievement Award in 2017 and is the first and only text to focus solely on Black LGBT Americans health. This summer he started work on his first sole-authored book that will explore contemporary issues of race and mental health in the United States. In addition, Dr. Lassiter has published numerous articles in academic journals and lay publications, presented his choreographic work in prestigious showcases in New York City, and provided psychotherapy to clients in medical centers across the country. Currently, Dr. Lassiter is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Muhlenberg College and Visiting Assistant Professor of Medicine at University of California, San Francisco.

With additional support from the Helen Weinberger Center for Drama and Playwriting, University of Cincinnati.

Start: Oct 29, 2018
End: Oct 29, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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November 8

The Magnificent Peony Dreams: Yin Mei – Installation Performance + Artist Talk

The creation of Peony Dreams: On the Other Side of Sleep, is supported by the National Dance Project of the New England Foundation for the Art. Photo by Rachel Cooper.

Thursday, November 8
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Installation Performance and Discussion + 2:00pm Screenings

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Join us for a day exploring the works and vision of Yin Mei, Chinese-American choreographer, performer, director, and professor of Dance at Queens College, CUNY in conversation with visiting scholars and professors from China as part of the exchange partnership between Shanghai Theatre Academy (STA, China), the Theatre Department at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center.

Employing Chinese energy direction and spatial principles as a means for creating dance within the rubric of contemporary dance theater, Yin Mei aims to make visible the inner world that lies beneath the surface of everyday life—a parallel world beyond material purposes and goals, filled with mystery. As part of a generation of artists growing up and performing during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, Yin Mei exposes in her works how personal memories, tattooed images of rage, harmony, solemnity and quiet silence exude an ethereal and illusory mood.

Afternoon screenings will feature excerpts of her works*, and the evening will present an installation performance, with pianist Bill Buchman, dancers Huiwang Zhang and Guanglei Hui, followed by an artist talk by Yin Mei, and a panel with Ethan Cohen, Jodi Kaplan, Gan Yu, Marvin CarlsonYong Fei, Kaiqi Hu, Zhenlin Li. Moderated by Frank Hentschker.

*Screenings Schedule 

2:00pm
Seven Sages of Bamboo Grove  Kwai Tsing Theatre, Hong Kong | 2012 | 100mins
Empty Tradition/City of Peonies  The Asia Society, NY | 1998 | 15mins

4:00pm
Nixon in China (excerpt)  Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris | 2012 | 11mins
Cursive  The Vision Festival, NY | 2006 | 6mins
/Asunder  Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church, NY | 2001 | 13mins

4:30pm
DIS/oriented: Antonioni in China  The Asia Society, NY | 2013 | 30mins

 

Photo courtesy of the artist.

Yin Mei was born in China and started her professional career in traditional Chinese dance during the Cultural Revolution. Joining a leading state dance company at the age of fourteen, she was trained in Chinese traditional dance and Peking opera dance. Before coming to the United States to study modern dance on a grant from the Asian Cultural Council, she was a professional dancer with the Henan Song and Dance Troupe and later a principal dancer with the Hong Kong Dance Company, where she danced leading roles in the traditional Chinese dance repertoire. She is now a professor and the Director of dance at Queens College, City University of New York, and the artistic director of Yin Mei Dance Company.

She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Asian Cultural Council Fellowship, and a Choreography Fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts. She is a Fulbright Scholar and has been nominated twice for a Cal-Arts Alpert Award in Choreography. Her productions have been supported multiple times by grants from Rockefeller MAP, New England Foundation for the Arts, National Dance Project, Creative Capital, Meet the Composer, Live Music for Dance, Greenwall Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, and more.

Start: Nov 8, 2018
End: Nov 8, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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November 12

Japanese Playwrights Project (Day 1): Satoko Ichihara/Kristine Haruna Lee, Jun Tsutsui/Soraya Broukhim, Kuro Tanino/Mallory Catlett

Kuro Tanino’s Avidya – No Light’s Inn. Photo by Shinsuke Sugino

Monday, November 12
Segal Theatre
2:00pm, 5:00pm, 7:00pm Readings + Discussions

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

After the success of the first edition of the Japanese Playwrights Project (JPP) in 2007 once again the Segal Center brings some of the brightest, most innovative, and most engaging emerging playwrights from Japan to New York to develop their pieces through translation into English and public readings of the work. The Japan Playwrights Project plays an important role in introducing contemporary writing and dramaturgy from Japan to the US.

In 2018, the Japanese Playwrights Project is proud to present:

A Question of Faeries by Satoko Ichihara
Favonia’s Fruitless Fable by Satoko Ichihara
Isla, Isla, Isla! by Yudai Kamisato
Avidya – Hot Spring Junkies in Hell Valley by Kuro Tanino
Sokonaizu by Jun Tsutsui

The Japanese Playwrights Project 2018 was made possible by the generous support of the Japan Foundation, New York (Koji Nozaki, Sanae Tani, and Kenji Matsumoto). Additional support for English translations by the Japan Playwrights Association. The Japanese Playwrights Project 2018 was initiated and realized by Frank Hentschker and Aya Ogawa.

Board of Advisors – Japan: Peter Eckersall, Shintaro Fujii, Kako Kishimoto, Hiromi Maruoka, Aya Ogawa, Toshiki Okada, and Masahiko Yokobori.
Board of Advisors – New York: Peter Eckersall, Anne Erbe, Frank Hentschker, Andrew Kircher, Kate Loewald, Aya Ogawa, and Yoko Shioya.

Participants of the 2007 JPP included Masataka Matsuda, Akio Miyazawa, Toshiki Okada, and Mikuni Yanaihara. Josh Fox/International WOW Company; Dan Safer/Witness Relocation, Jay Scheib, and The Play Company each presented successful productions in New York theatres.

 

 

 

Monday, November 12 (Click here for Day 2 Schedule)

2:00pm Favonia’s Fruitless Fable (毛美子不毛話)
written by Satoko Ichihara
directed by Kristine Haruna Lee
translated by Aya Ogawa

“Me” is a female office worker who, obsessed with a strange rumor, comes wandering through a back alley night after night in search of real leather pumps. In the back alley she has a series of encounters with a variety of questionable characters: a distorted version of a male office worker who is a superior at her company, another “Me,” a middle-aged man who has a huge cock growing out of the middle of his chest, and a shifty salesman. A two-person play (1M, 1F) portraying life in the chaos of contemporary society. Nominated for the 61st Kunio Kishida Prize for Drama.

5:00pm Sokonaizu (ソコナイ図)
written by Jun Tsutsui
directed by Soraya Broukhim
translated by Tomoyuki Arai

It isn’t clear whether it’s the end of the year or the beginning of the year. Two women are lying still in a room. No one knows the size of it. They are sisters. The younger speaks, but with a voice in her mind, her mouth isn’t actually voicing a sound. She may find her older sister dead, so she’s afraid to speak to her and she is also afraid of realizing that she herself can’t possibly utter a word, which would mean she is dead. An official of the city where the sisters live has noticed their accident, but he doesn’t make an effort to help. The older sister dies and speaks to say that her life was very poor because of the enormous inheritance tax caused by the land left by their parents. Their parents had passed away suddenly. The younger sister only remains, still in her room without knowing whether she has seen the old year out or not and whether she is dead or not.

7:00pm Avidya – Hot Spring Junkies in Hell Valley
written by Kuro Tanino
directed by Mallory Catlett
translated by Mari Boyd

The play is set in an old hot spring inn, located deep in the mountains of Japan. The health spa has long been cherished by the local villagers as a place to rest and cure them of their ailments. However, it is fated to be torn down to make way for a new railroad. One day in 2015, as the autumn prepares to change into winter, a rather peculiar father and son arrive from Tokyo. They are puppeteers who have come to put on a show at the request of the inn-owner. The father is a dwarf while his son is a rather eerie, expressionless figure who always seems to be wearing a mask. With their client nowhere in sight, the father and son wait in vain at the inn. As evening comes and their means of returning home is lost, they are forced to spend the night. While the villagers are puzzled by the sudden visit of this eccentric father and son, they are also intrigued. In time, the villagers find the depths of their minds shaken, exposing their inner darkness.

About the Playwrights

Satoko Ichihara is playwright, director, and novelist. Born in 1988, she studied theater at J.F. Oberlin University. Ichihara narrates the absurdity of life and the vitality of humans who shine in the rankling world from the perspective of women, delivered mainly through monologues. While setting great value on the bodies of performers, she also emphasizes the expression of texts and their rhythms. Her works are carefully built as if from an outside perspective into the behaviors of humans and animals. She aims to immerse the audience in the vibrancy and the bounding pulse of life. In 2011, Satoko received the Aichi Arts Foundation Drama Award with the play Insects. In 2013, she was selected to stage Qlobe of Life Ⅱ as part of the Festival/Tokyo. In 2016, the novel Insects was released in the literary journal Subaru. In 2017, she was a finalist for 61st Kishida Kunio Playwriting award for Favonia’s Fruitless Fable and was invited to present Favonia’s Fruitless Fable at the Seoul Marginal Theater Festival. In 2018 Satoko became a Saison Foundation Junior Fellow Artist. qqq-qqq-qqq.com

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Kuro Tanino, a playwright and director, was born in 1976 in Toyama Prefecture. Kuro Tanino is the artistic director of Niwa Gekidan Penino as well as resident playwright and director. He is a Saison Foundation Senior Fellow. After launching Niwa Gekidan Penino while still a medical student in 2000, he has since written and directed all the company’s plays. He was nominated for the prestigious Kishida Kunio Drama Award in 2007 and 2008, and has received invitations to festivals around the world. He premiered Käfig aus Wasser in March 2015 in Germany, while Avidya: No Lights Inn won the Kishida Kunio Drama Award in 2016.

 

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Jun Tsutsui, born in Osaka in 1971, is a director, playwright and performer who leads dracom, an Osaka-based performance group. He received his MA at Osaka University of Arts in 1997, the Kyoto Art Center Performing Arts Award for his direction of dracom’s Moreuta in 2007 and The Saison Foundation’s Senior Fellow scholarship for 2014–2016. With dracom he has participated in such events as the International Showcase of Tokyo Performing Arts Market 2008, Emerging Artists Program of Festival/Tokyo 2010, Sound Live Tokyo 2014 in collaboration with Small Wooden Shoe (Toronto) and Nippon Performance Night 2017 at FFT (Düsseldorf). He has worked with such artists/groups as Akio Suzuki, Zan Yamashita, Noriyuki Kiguchi, Masataka Matsuda, Ishinha, Toenkai and Takatsuki Senior Theatre Company formed by amateur performers all older than 50, as well as on dance projects with Kyoto University of Art & Design and Dance Box (Kobe). He has been running a small space OPA_Lab in Settsu City, Osaka, where he regularly presents experimental productions including Rough Play, where performers collectively learn a full-length classical or contemporary play in a day and perform it relying only on their uncertain and unorganized memory.

 

About the Directors

Mallory Catlett is a creator and director of performance across disciplines from opera and music theater to plays and installation art. She is the founder of Restless NYC whose Obie Award winning production, This Was The End, was recently remounted at Mabou Mines. Work outside of Restless includes: visual artist Nene Humphrey’s Transmissions (2017) at Leslie Heller Gallery and Mika Karlsson’s opera The Echo Drift (Prototype Festival 2018). She is a member of the multi-disciplinary artist led performance venue The Collapsable Hole. In NYC her work has premiered at 3LD, HERE, PS122, Abrons, Chocolate Factory; featured at COIL, Prototype and BAM’s Next Wave; and toured internationally to Canada, France, UK, Ireland & Australia. She is a Foundation of Contemporary Arts 2015 Awardee and a 2016 Creative Capital Artist. She is an Assistant Professor in Theatre Arts at Stony Brook University.

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Kristine Haruna Lee is a theater maker whose work navigates non-linear playwriting, the practice and performance of auto-theory, and the construction of visually rich performance landscapes with her company harunalee, hailed by the New York Times as “So full of impulses and splendid, fractious energy”. Recent plays with harunalee include Memory Retrograde (The Public’s Under The Radar Festival), to the left of the pantry and under the sugar shack (La MaMa Club), and War Lesbian (Dixon Place TONY LGBT Critic’s Pick). Her play Suicide Forest directed by Aya Ogawa will premiere at the Bushwick Starr in February 2019. She’s a recipient of the MAP Fund Award, the Lotos Foundation Prize for Directing, New Dramatists Van Lier Fellowship, and has been a member of Interstate 73, The Public’s Devised Theater Working Group, Ars Nova Maker’s Lab, and BAX AIR. She is an affiliated artist with New Georges and currently in the Soho Rep Writer/Director Lab. MFA Brooklyn College for Playwriting with Mac Wellman and Erin Courtney, BFA NYU Tisch Experimental Theater Wing.

Photo courtesy of the artist.

Soraya Broukhim is a multidisciplinary artist, an actor, a director, a poet, a teacher & Ayurvedic healer. She has collaborated in creating new devised projects with The Living Theatre beside Judith Malina and core-members since 2010, with A Laboratory for Actor Training e.t.c. beside director Vernice Miller, Ripe Time, Williamstown Theatre Festival, O’Neill Playwright Conference, Drama League, Tofte Lake Center & National Theatre Institute. She is an Artistic Associate at the Living Theatre. And Development-Marketing Director at A.L.A.T. etc. Ms. Broukhim is also currently an adjunct professor at Fordham University Lincoln Center teaching majors Devised-Collaboration Theatre. She graduated from Fordham University at Lincoln Center, BAADA, NTI & St.Petersburg Arts Theatre Academy. For acting credits please go to www.sorayabroukhim.com

Start: Nov 12, 2018
End: Nov 12, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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November 13

Japanese Playwrights Project (Day 2): Yudai Kamisato/Tony Torn/Sarah Hughes, Satoko Ichihara/Kyoko Takenaka

Yudai Kamisato’s Isla, Isla, Isla! Photo © Yuta Fukitsuka

Tuesday, November 13
Segal Theatre
4:00pm, 7:00pm Readings + Discussions

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

After the success of the first edition of the Japanese Playwrights Project (JPP) in 2007 once again the Segal Center brings some of the brightest, most innovative, and most engaging emerging playwrights from Japan to New York to develop their pieces through translation into English and public readings of the work. The Japan Playwrights Project plays an important role in introducing contemporary writing and dramaturgy from Japan to the US.

In 2018, the Japanese Playwrights Project is proud to present:

A Question of Faeries by Satoko Ichihara
Favonia’s Fruitless Fable by Satoko Ichihara
Isla, Isla, Isla! by Yudai Kamisato
Avidya – Hot Spring Junkies in Hell Valley by Kuro Tanino
Sokonaizu by Jun Tsutsui

The Japanese Playwrights Project 2018 was made possible by the generous support of the Japan Foundation, New York (Koji Nozaki, Sanae Tani, and Kenji Matsumoto). Additional support for English translations by the Japan Playwrights Association. The Japanese Playwrights Project 2018 was initiated and realized by Frank Hentschker and Aya Ogawa.

Board of Advisors – Japan: Peter Eckersall, Shintaro Fujii, Kako Kishimoto, Hiromi Maruoka, Aya Ogawa, Toshiki Okada, and Masahiko Yokobori.
Board of Advisors – New York: Peter Eckersall, Anne Erbe, Frank Hentschker, Andrew Kircher, Kate Loewald, Aya Ogawa, and Yoko Shioya.

Participants of the 2007 JPP included Masataka Matsuda, Akio Miyazawa, Toshiki Okada, and Mikuni Yanaihara. Josh Fox/International WOW Company; Dan Safer/Witness Relocation, Jay Scheib, and The Play Company each presented successful productions in New York theatres.

 

 

 

Tuesday, November 13 (Click here for Day 1 schedule)

4:00pm Isla, Isla, Isla! (イスラ!イスラ!イスラ!)
written by Yudai Kamisato
directed by Sarah Hughes, performed by Tony Torn
translated by Aya Ogawa

On a fictitious island in the south, an island dictator addresses his countless soldiers before a battle. In part he recounts the story of how he, the king of the island himself, arrived on the island and encountered the first natives there. He goes on to describe the lengthy history of how he brought “civilization” to the island, and recounts his violent encounters with his rival, a monstrous bird of the island. Soon the island is wracked by a huge earthquake, followed by the arrival of a wave of foreigners. With the new inventions brought onto the island, the island itself is transformed irrevocably. The king’s words gradually become the voice of the island itself. With references to real historical events, this play portrays an epic and mythological reflection on colonization, immigration, culture and civilization.

7:00pm A Question of Faeries (妖精の問題)
written and directed by Satoko Ichihara
performed by Kyoko Takenaka with English subtitles by Aya Ogawa

The 2016 mass murder of disabled people that shook Japanese society to the core was the departure point for the playwright. The play turns a critical eye towards contemporary society’s value judgment on issues of ideology of eugenics, and the aging population. The play is comprised of three acts in three different styles (Act 1 as rakugo, a traditional Japanese stand-up comedy form; Act 2 as a music piece; and Act 3 a seminar) and performed primarily by a single performer. The second act requires live accompaniment by a pianist, featuring compositions by emerging composer Masashi Nukata (Tokyo Siokouji / nuthmique). The actor Kyoko Takenaka was the first Japanese actor to be accepted into Frances’ École nationale supérieure d’art dramatique de Montpellier as an actor. This performance for JPP is a simplified version of the full production and is performed by one main actor.

About the Playwrights

Photo courtesy of the artist

Yudai Kamisato is a director and playwright, and the head of Okazaki Art Theatre.
He was born in Peru in 1982 and in now based in Tokyo and Kawasaki. In his teens, he lived for a few years in the Republic of Paraguay and the United States of America. In 2006, he became the youngest person ever to win the first prize in the TOGA Directors Competition for his staging of Desire Caught by the Tail, a farcical play with a script by Pablo Picasso, and he won the prize for the Kishida Kunio Drama Award in 2018 with The Story of Descending the Long Slopes of Valparaíso which premiered in Kyoto Experiment 2017. He made his debut as a novelist in 2013. In October 2016, he undertook one year of residence in Buenos Aires, Argentina under the Program of Overseas Study for Upcoming Artists offered by the Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs. Between fiscal years 2011 and 2016, he served as a junior fellow of The Saison Foundation. More recently, he has been creating works that derive from heightened interest in his own identity and reflect deep insights into problems confronting immigrants and workers, the relationship between the individual and national identity, and communication with contemporary others.

Satoko Ichihara is a playwriter, director and novelist. Born in 1988. Studied theater at J.F. Oberlin University. Ichihara narrates the absurdity of life and the vitality of humans who shine in the rankling world from the perspective of women, delivered mainly through monologues. While setting great value on the bodies of performers, she also emphasizes the expression of texts and their rhythms. Her works are carefully built as if from an outside perspective into the behaviors of humans and animals, and aim to immerse the audience in the vibrancy and the bounding pulse of life. 2011, Receives the Aichi Arts Foundation Drama Award with the play “Insects” .2013, Serected to stage “Qlobe of Life Ⅱ” as part of the Festival/Tokyo. 2016, Released the novel “Insects” in the literary journal “Subaru”. 2017, Nominated for finalist of 61st Kishida Kunio Playwriting award for “Favonia’s Fruitless Fable”. Invited to present “Favonia’s Fruitless Fable” at the Seoul Marginal Theater Festival. 2018, Selected to The Saison Foundation Junior fellow Artist.

 

About the Directors

Sarah Hughes is a director and producer of theater and new media. She’s developed performances with artists such as Eliza Bent, Julia May Jonas / Nellie Tinder, MJ Kaufman, Sibyl Kempson, McFeely Sam Goodman, Chana Porter, Deepali Gupta, Cara Scarmack, Alaina Ferris, and Pablo Helguera. With Graham Sack, Geoff Sobelle & Sensorium she’s created VR & AR pieces for Tribeca Film Festival, New York Theatre Workshop, and The New York Times. She’s presented work at Abrons Arts Center, BAM Next Wave, JACK, The Bushwick Starr, Japan Society, PEN World Voices, Columbia University, and Prelude, among others. Sarah worked with Elevator Repair Service from 2007-14, assistant directing Gatz, The Select, Arguendo, Shuffle, and Fondly, Collette Richland, and she was Co-Artistic Producer of Target Margin Theater from 2015-17. www.sarahcameronhughes.com

Start: Nov 13, 2018
End: Nov 13, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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November 26

A Sit-In at the Library: ’68 Revisited

Photo by Paul Klee. From the Collection of Paul Cronin.

Monday, November 26
The Graduate Center Mina Rees Library
1:00pm – 8:30pm + 6:00pm Performance
FREE + Open to public. All Welcome

In 1968, the student body emerged on the global scene as a cohesive revolutionary movement fighting alongside oppressed people in India, East and Western Europe, South and North America, and articulating a new political horizon.

50 years later, what remains of that emancipatory promise? Is there such a thing as a student body today, or should students be seen as individual investors in the knowledge economy? What are the contemporary meanings, stakes, and privileges of being a student? Which coalitions and networks of solidarity are maintained by students, and which are avoided or neglected? What political possibilities does a “student” status afford today, and what possibilities should it afford?

To promote a reconsideration of such questions, and as a critical homage to the 1968 sit-ins and alternative modes of congregation, the Mina Rees library at the CUNY Graduate Center will rearrange its ground floor and open its doors to the general public to share the space, sit together, talk, perform, meet and listen.

The Sit-in at the Library is a free, public and loosely curated forum that welcomes public participation and engagement. We invite you to shape the day with your ideas, questions, writings, screenings, teach-ins, or acts.

The event will be followed by a 6:00pm performance of The Fall by Sister Sylvester.

The Fall (2018) is a deconstructed film-screening based on Peter Whitehead’s cult 1969 film, The Fall. Shot in New York during the collapse of the protest movement, The Fall began as a fiction film, but quickly changed course as Whitehead found himself inside Columbia University during the student occupation and subsequent police attacks. Denied release because potential backers found the film too violent, Whitehead’s experiences making the film caused him to reject the social efficacy of art, quit film-making, and move to the highest mountain in Saudi Arabia to breed falcons. The film, however, followed its own path, finding its way to Greece during the student movement which led to the overthrow of the Junta, and to Iran during the university led movement which became the revolution. The Fall stages a film- lecture/screening that presents Sister Sylvester’s original research into this story, and questions the relationship between art and social action.

Photo by Maria Baranova.

Sister Sylvester makes work, often essayistic performances, using first hand research and found documents. Sister Sylvester invite disruption into both the performance and the process, and look for dissonance and difficulty in text, image, and sound.

 

 

Organized by Doctoral Students of Theatre and Performance Amir Farjoun, Cory Tamler and Mara Valderrama.

Additional support from Doctoral and Graduate Students’ Council.

 

Date: November 26
Venue: The Graduate Center Mina Rees Library
Category:
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December 3

Parliament (1st NY Session) with Michael Kliën (Austria/US)

Photo courtesy of the artist.

 

Monday, December 3
Segal Theatre
4:30pm Closed Participatory Event* + 8:30pm Artist Talk

FREE  + Open to public. First come, first served.

Reservation Required

The participatory event will be closed to audiences, to participate please RSVP corytamler@gmail.com                                                                  

The Segal Center is proud to present the CUNY version of Parliament (1st NY Session). Parliament is a pioneering work of situational choreography and exploration of ecological aesthetics. The work offers participants a critically needed withdrawal from normal modes of social action and provides instead an innovative site for 21st-century experimentalist cooperation. Embedded in the immediacy of Michael Kliën’s choreographic framework, citizen-performers, working in silence, come together to bear witness to and hold council amidst the elemental phenomena and fundamental concerns of collectively lived experience. Pointing towards unseen and unexperienced modes of social organization, Parliament traverses, probes and navigates the paradigms that animate our present-day political relations.

Produced in collaboration with Cory Tamler.

Photo courtesy of the artist

Michael Kliën (born 1973) is a choreographer and artist. Considered one of Europe’s most notable thinkers in contemporary dance and choreography, he has been commissioned by leading institutions including Ballett Frankfurt, Martha Graham Dance Company, New Museum, Irish Museum of Modern Art, and Hayward Gallery. As Artistic Director/CEO of Daghdha (2003-2011, Ireland) he developed an extended, socio-politically engaged choreography referred to as ‘Social Choreography’. Kliën’s practice encompasses interdisciplinary thinking, writing, curation, and centrally, choreographic works equally at home in performing and fine arts. He was awarded a PhD from Edinburgh College of Art in 2009. In 2017 Kliën took up the position of Associate Professor of Practice at Duke University.

Start: Dec 3, 2018
End: Dec 3, 2018
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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December 10

Performing Knowledge: A Day of Lecture Performances

Joseph Beuys, Untitled (Sun State), 1974.

Monday, December 10

4:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Segal Theatre

Lecture Performances by Meg Araneo, Jon McKenzie & Aneta Stojnić, Polly Thistlethwaite and GC Students

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Like theatres, lecture halls and classrooms rehearse specific conventions to organize performance and spectatorship, teaching and learning. Like other conventions, the dramaturgy of the lecture is a product of overlapping factors and traditions. But in what new ways can knowledge be pursued, conceived and presented? 

Performing Knowledge gathers prominent scholars and graduate students from various programs at the Graduate Center to experiment with new ways of doing learning. Departing from a performative, embodied and experienced-based understanding of knowledge, the lecture-performances all introduce ostensibly ‘alien’ and ‘irrelevant’ elements into the pedagogical situation. By including the often suppressed elements of doubt, dialogue, sound, movement, alternative research narratives and knowledge-bearing bodies, the performing scholars develop novel dramaturgies of knowledge. Their alternative academic practices respond to Wendy Brown’s call to recover “what is ineffably moving, sublime, or meaningful in the humanities” by pointing towards the immense variety of forms that academic production can take as it renegotiates its generic assumptions.

 

Schedule*:

To download the full program, press here.

4:00-4:20 | Carolyn A. McDonough – Embodying Voice

4:30-4:50 | Julián González de León and Davide Giuseppe Colasanto – Visual Presentations of Theories of Knowledge

5:00-5:20 | Polly Thistlethwaite – Recovering Doubt: A Documentary’s Staged Deceptions

5:30-5:50 | Michelle Yom – ‘Excerpts’ from War on Terror

6:00-6:20 | Margaret Araneo-Reddy – Salome Project

6:30-6:50 |Callen Zimmerman – Getting Located

** 7:00-7:40 | Jon McKenzie and Aneta Stojnić – Thought-Action Figures Episode 11: Kosmograms

8:00-8:30 | Q&A with participating performing researchers

 

*In addition to the performances, Arinn Amer‘s sculpture, The Emplotment Problem (Tarring and Feathering Four Ways), will be installed outside the theatre for the day’s duration.

** Event livestreamed through howlround.

Performing Knowledge is an initiative by Amir Farjoun co-produced with Mara Valderrama, Ph.D. Students at the Theatre and Performance program at the Graduate Center CUNY, in collaboration with the Segal Center. Additional Support by the DSC

Date: December 10
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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December 12

Devised Theatre: Curating, Producing, Presenting (A Practical Roundtable)

Covers of Moment Work: Tectonic Theater Project’s Process of Devising Theater and Ensemble-Made Chicago: A Guide to Devised Theater.

Wednesday, December 12
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Discussion + 3:00pm Workshop + 5:30pm Book Talk

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

What is devised theater? This form, which confounds traditional notions of theatermaking, is itself confounding. It has come to mean many different (and sometimes conflicting) things, depending on the context. Join our working group discussion, featuring producing institutions, artists, legal experts, and scholars, as we attempt to create a comprehensive definition for the “devised theater.” What happens when the collaboration expands beyond traditional definitions? How is the work curated, produced, presented, compensated and credited?

3:00pm Workshop
Register at mestc@gc.cuny.edu for a special Devised Theatre afternoon workshop with the Dramatists Guild on their new devised theater partnership contract templates.

5:30pm Book Talk
with Jimmy Maize/Barbara Pitts McAdams, Moment Work (2018), and Coya Paz, Ensemble-Made Chicago: A Guide to Devised Theater (2018)

6:30pm Practical Roundtable: Defining Devised
with Janani Balasubramanian, Dr. Natalie Gosnell, Sandra Garner, Ryan J. Haddad, Kathryn Hamilton, Flako Jimenez, Ayesha Jordan, Andrew Kircher, Jimmy Maize, Barbara Pitts McAdams, Deborah Murad, Caitlin Ryan O’Connell, Aya Ogawa, Dan Rothenberg, Sam Schanwald, and Alyssa Simmons.

Organized and led by Andrew Kircher, Director of The Public Theater’s Devised Theater Initiative.

 

Start: Dec 12, 2018
End: Dec 12, 2018
Category:
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December 13

Teatro delle Albe (Italy): Artist Talk with Marco Martinelli

Photo by Lidia Bagnara.

Thursday, December 13
La MaMa Theater – Downstairs Theatre (66 4th Street, New York)

6:30pm Artist Talk

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Join us for an artist talk with Marco Martinelli and a reading by Ermanna Montanari from Teatro delle Albe’s latest production, Love’s Faithful (fedeli d’amore) – A Polyptych in Seven Panels for Dante Alighieri (Fedeli d’Amore). The unusual participatory work is a reflection by Marco Martinelli “about” Dante Alighieri and the contemporary world. Dante, himself a refugee, fled from Florence when he was condemned to death by burning at the stake. We meet Dante on his deathbed in 1321, exiled in Ravenna, the home of the Teatro delle Albe.

This “polyptych” for the stage enriches the itinerary by Martinelli and Montanari on The Divine Comedy, a project from 2017 to 2021 where the whole city is a stage and all citizens are called on to participate.

 

Photo courtesy by artist

Marco Martinelli, playwright and director, founded with Ernanna Montanari the Teatro delle Albe (1983), one of the most respected Italian theatre companies. Martinelli has been awarded numerous prizes including: five Ubu Prizes; the Drammaturgia In/Finita Prize; the Hystrio Prize; the Golden Laurel-international Festival Mess; the Prize for Career Achievement- international festival Journées théâtrales de Carthage.His texts have been published and staged in Italy, France (selected by the European projects on contemporary playwriting Face à Face and Fabulamundi), Belgium, Germany, Romania, Slovakia, Chile, Brazil and the United States (translated in English by Thomas Simpson).

Ermanna Montanari, actress, author and set designer, Teatro delle Albe’s founder and artistic director with Marco Martinelli, for her work and in particular for her extraordinary itinerary of vocal and musical research, has been awarded prestigious acknowledgements including: three Ubu Prizes, the Golden Laurel-international Festival Mess; the Lo straniero Prize-dedicated to the memory of Carmelo Bene; the Eleonora Duse Prize, and the Prize of the Associazione Nazionale Critici di Teatro.

Presented in collaboration with Umanism, Italian Playwright Project, Valeria Orani (Director) with additional support from La MaMa, Mia Yoo, Artistic Director, and the Italian Cultural Insitute.
Media partner Rai Radio3

     

Start: Dec 13, 2018
End: Dec 13, 2018
Venue: LaMaMa- The Downstairs, 66 4th Street, New York, NY
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